United States Relations with China: With Special Reference to the Period 1944-1949

By United States Department Of State | Go to book overview

Annexes to Chapter III: The Ambassador-
ship of Major General Patrick J. Hurley,
1944-1946

45
The Ambassador in China (Gauss) to Secretary Hull

893.00/8-3144

CHUNGKING, August 31, 1944

Yesterday evening President Chiang Kai-shek sent for me. For an hour and a half he talked about the Communist problem, stating that it is not understood in Washington, and it is my duty to be sure the problem is understood. Set forth below are the principal points of the argument which Chiang constantly emphasized and repeated, in addition to the usual charges of bad faith and treachery against the Communists:

In the matter of world problems, China is disposed to follow our lead ; and it is not unfriendly for us to suggest that China should improve relations with the Soviet Union. China should receive the entire support and sympathy of the United States Government on the domestic problem of Chinese Communists. Very serious consequences for China may result from our attitude. In urging that China resolve differences with the Communists, our Government's attitude is serving only to intensify the recalcitrance of the Communists. The request that China meet Communist demands is equivalent to asking China's unconditional surrender to a party known to be under a foreign power's influence (the Soviet Union). The Communists are growing arrogant and refuse to continue negotiations since our observer group arrived in Yenan. The United States should tell the Communists to reconcile their differences with and submit to the national government of China.

This could be done by our observer group as well as by the Embassy in any contact we have with representatives of the Communists at this point. In addition, the strength of Communist armies could be determined by observer group. The need of Communist forces to defeat Japan should not be stressed by us. The Chinese Communists are under the influence of a foreign power; neither that power nor the Communists dares condemn it, since to do so would condemn the Communists before the people of China in general. The Communists' expansionist ambitions are what brought about assignment of troops to prevent expansion of this nature; prove all Communists cannot be trusted. Furthermore, Chiang Kai-shek commented that the problem of Communist cooperation would not be solved by introduction of a foreign commander of Chinese armies. Chiang stated that there are persons in Washington who seem to believe that it is merely a matter of issuing military orders to have them obeyed and said that the Communists have not obeyed, although he has ordered them to attack the Japanese.

-561-

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