Electronic Text: Investigations in Method and Theory

By Kathryn Sutherland | Go to book overview

8
Digital Archive as Expanded Text: Shakespeare and Electronic Textuality

PETER S. DONALDSON


INTRODUCTION

The materials relevant to the study of Shakespeare are extensive: they include the early folio and quarto editions, the literally hundreds of complete editions and the much greater number of editions of single works published since the seventeenth century, a vast body of critical and interpretive literature, a small library of sources and supposed sources, records of theatrical productions, including playbills, promptbooks, reviews, and other materials. Shakespeare's works have been copiously illustrated, documented, and interpreted in the visual arts, from the water-colour illustrations in promptbooks to etchings, engravings, oil paintings, and photographs. The film, video, and audio record is uniquely extensive. Shakespeare on film begins in the first years of the medium, with King John in 1899, Hamlet's 'death scene' performed by Sarah Bernhardt in 1900, and includes over 700 titles in the recent filmographies edited by Kenneth Rothwell and Annabelle Meltzer1 and by Olwen Terris and Luke McKernan.2 Shakespeare materials are of unusual cultural range and geographic distribution--there are translations into most major languages, long traditions of performance and interpretation in Germany, Scandinavia, most of Europe, and in all English-speaking countries; there are important Russian, Japanese, German, Swedish films, and a rapidly increasing number of video records of productions from every part of the world.

In 1992 the Shakespeare Electronic Archive was founded at MIT in order to explore the potential of emerging electronic technologies to enhance access to these materials. Our vision--first articulated in Larry Friedlander's plans for a 'living variorum' in 19883--is of an electronic archive, eventually networked and available throughout the world, in which documents of all kinds-films, sound recordings, texts, digital facsimiles--would be linked in electronic form to one another and to the lines of text to which they refer or which they enact. There are substantial barriers to immediate implementation of such a scheme even in an

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Electronic Text: Investigations in Method and Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Notes on Contributors viii
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2- The Rationale of Hypertext 19
  • Conclusion: the Rossetti Hypermedia Archive 38
  • Notes 45
  • 3- Annotating a Text: Literary Theory And Electronic Hypertext 47
  • Notes 63
  • 4- Lighting Out for the Territory: Hypertext, Ideology, And Huckleberry Finn 67
  • Notes 96
  • Appendix Distribution of Links and Nodes In Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 103
  • 5- Out of Praxis: Three (meta)theories Of Textuality 107
  • Introduction 107
  • Conclusion 124
  • Notes 124
  • 6- The Body Encoded: Questions Of Gender and the Electronic Text 127
  • Notes 141
  • 7- New Directions in Critical Editing 145
  • Notes 165
  • 8- Digital Archive as Expanded Text: Shakespeare and Electronic Textuality 173
  • Introduction 173
  • Notes 195
  • 9- Coda: is It Morphin Time? 199
  • Notes 222
  • Select Bibliography 227
  • Index 237
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