Who Makes Public Policy?: The Struggle for Control between Congress and the Executive

By Robert S. Gilmour; Alexis A. Halley et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

Diana Evans is associate professor of political science at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Her research and publications deal with Congress and interest groups as well as congressional policy making in transportation.

Robert S. Gilmour is professor of political science at the University of Connecticut and a member of the District of Columbia bar. He is a former senior professional staff member of the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, and was director of the Congress and Executive project sponsored by the National Academy of Public Administration. He is the author or coauthor of numerous articles and books on congressional-executive relations, including Politics, Position, and Power: From the Positive to the Regulatory State (4th edition, 1986) with Harold Seidman.

Alexis A. Halley is a senior management consultant addressing questions of leadership, governance, and change in the public sector. She is director of the John C. Stennis Congressional Fellows Program for senior congressional staff, sponsored by the Stennis Center for Public Service and the Council for Excellence in Government. She served as associate director of studies and project co-director of the Congress and Executive project at the National Academy of Public Administration. She has written or edited numerous publications, including Delivering Human Services: A Learning Approach to Practice (3d edition, 1992).

G. Calvin Mackenzie is the Distinguished Presidential Professor of American Government at Colby College. He has worked in both the legislative and executive branches, and his books include The House at Work, The Politics of Presidential Appointments, and American Government: Politics and Public Policy.

Thomas L. McNaugher is senior fellow in the foreign policy studies program at the Brookings Institution. He is a former policy analyst at the Rand Corporation. His books include The MI6 Controversies: Military Organizations and Weapons Acquisition; Arms and Oil: U.S. Military Strategy and the Persian Gulf

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