The Muslims of America

By Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
M. Arif Ghayur, "Muslims in the United States: Settlers and Visitors," Annals AAPPS 454 ( March 1981): 153.
2.
A figure of 3 million has been reported by the Zwemer Institute in Altadena, California, and Zaman in a report by Yvonne Haddad and Adair T. Lummis, "Islamic Values in the United States: A Comprehensive Study," unpublished paper, p. 1.
3.
Ancestry of the Population by the State: 1980 ( Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Census, Department of Commerce, 1983), pp. 12-32.
4.
" Immigrants admitted by Country or Region of Birth, 1954-1986" (report prepared for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Department of Justice, Washington, D.C., 1987), pp. 1-14.
5.
" Muslim Population" (report prepared for Zwemer Institute of Muslim Studies, Altadena, Calif., 1987), pp. 1-4. Percentages reported here are similar to estimates reported in an independent publication, in Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, Atlas of World Population History ( New York: Facts on File, 1978). Data for China were a notable exception, where the Zwemer Institute reported 4%, and McEvedy and Jones reported 30% Muslim. An average value of 17.7% was chosen for the study, a value very similar to the average percentage of Muslim population in Asia.
6.
Ancestry of the Population by State: 1980, pp. 12-32.
7.
Ibid.
8.
" Muslim Population," pp. 1-4.
9.
" Immigrants admitted by Country or Region of Birth, 1954-1986," pp. 1-14.
10.
" Muslim Population," pp. 1-14.
11.
Statistical Abstract of the United States ( Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Census, Department of Commerce, 1987), p. 59.
12.
Ghayur provides an estimate of 40,000 Anglican—American Muslims in " Muslims in the United States: Settlers and Visitors," Annals AAPPS 454 ( March 1981): p. 153.
13.
Ancestry of the Population by State: 1980, pp. 77-78.
14.
Muslim Journal, 7801 S. Cottage Grove, Chicago, Ill. (telephone interview, January 1989). Sr. Aisha Mustafa, editor of the journal, emphasizes that the estimate of one million represents an average of all African—American Muslims, both unaffiliated and affiliated.
15.
Statistical Abstract of the United States, p. 52.
16.
Estimates of geographical concentration may be exaggerated or minimized by large concentrations of Muslims or non-Muslims relative to the proportion of Muslims from that ancestral country.
17.
Statistical Abstract of the United States, p. 20.
18.
Ibid.
19.
" Muslim Population," pp. 1-2.
20.
Ibid., p. 2.
21.
Ibid.
22.
Ibid., p. 1. The relatively large number of Egyptian immigrants deflated the overall proportion of Muslim immigration to 87% in 1986 and may have led to exaggerated estimates during this time period.
23.
Ibid., p. 2.
24.
The proportion of Muslim immigrants from these countries may have deviated with time from the proportion of Muslims reported to reside in the countries. This would lead to exaggerated or diminished estimates.

-35-

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The Muslims of America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Religion in America Series *
  • The Muslims of America *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • Contributors *
  • Introduction- the Muslims of America 3
  • Notes 8
  • I- The Muslims of the United States *
  • 1- Muslim Organizations in the United States 11
  • Notes 24
  • 2- Estimate of Muslims Living in America 25
  • Notes 35
  • References 36
  • II- Perceptions of Muslims in the United States *
  • 3- Perspectives of American Churches on Islam and the Muslim Community in North America 39
  • Notes 49
  • 4- The Muslim as the "Other" 53
  • Notes 61
  • III- Islamic Thought in the United States *
  • 5- Ismail R. Al-Faruqi 65
  • Notes 78
  • 6- Seyyed Hossein Nasr 80
  • Notes 92
  • 7- The Legacy of Fazlur Rahman 96
  • Notes 105
  • IV- Islamic Activity in the United States *
  • 8- Political Activity of Muslims in America 111
  • Notes 123
  • 9- Da''Wa in the West 125
  • Notes 134
  • 10- Muslims in Prison 136
  • Notes 151
  • 11- Islamic Education in the United States and Canada 157
  • Notes 173
  • V- Muslim Women in Intercultural Perspective *
  • 12- African-American Muslim Women 177
  • Notes 186
  • 13- Two-Way Acculturation 188
  • Notes 200
  • VI- American Muslims and the Question of Identity *
  • 14- Islamic Issues for Muslims in the United States 205
  • Notes 215
  • 15- American Foreign Policy in the Middle East and Its Impact on the Identity of Arab Muslims in the United States 217
  • Notes 231
  • 16- Convergence and Divergence in an Emergent Community 236
  • Notes 248
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