The Muslims of America

By Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad | Go to book overview

Islamic world as a whole. In the words of Kiswana: "The Islamic world is proud to count us for statistics, but they have no interest in assisting us toward freedom in this land where they are also pursuing the American Dream."


Notes
1.
C. Eric Lincoln, The Black Muslims in America ( Boston: Beacon Press, 1961); E. U. Essien-Udum, Black Nationalism ( New York: Dell, 1962); Dorothy Blake Fardan, Understanding Self and Society: An Islamic Perspective ( New York: Philosophical Library, 1981); Clifton E. Marsh, From Black Muslims to Muslims: The Transition from Separatism to Islam, 1930-1980 ( Metuchen, N.J.: The Scarecrow Press, Inc., 1984).
2.
See, for example, Raymond Hall, Black Separatism in the United States ( Hanover, N.H.: Dartmouth College University Press of New England, 1978).
3.
W . E. B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk ( Greenwich, Conn.: Fawcett Publications, 1961), p. 16.
4.
Ibid.
5.
Edmund David Cronon, Black Moses: The Story of Marcus Garvey ( Milwaukee: University of Wisconsin, 1955), p. 31.
6.
Ibid., pp. 31-36.
7.
It can be presumed that there was early contact through converts and immigrants. Prominent among the former was Muhammad Russell Webb, editor of The Moslem World. (His biography is being written by Akbar Muhammad, director of the African American Studies Department, State University of New York at Binghamton.) Among the immigrants, special note should be made of the Ahmadiyya Movement that counts tens of thousands of blacks in its membership (see Maulana Muhammad Ali, The True Conception of Ahmadiyyah Movement [ Lahore: Ahmadiyyah Anjuman Isha'at Islam, 1951], p. 258) and of the work of Sheikh Daoud and his wife, Sayeda Khadijah , editor of Sahabiyat, a bimonthly educational magazine for Muslim women.
8.
Walter Conn, Christian Conversion ( Mahwah, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1986), p. 5.
9.
James T. Richardson, "The Active vs. Passive Convert: Paradigm Conflict Conversion/Recruitment Research," Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 24 ( 1985), 119-236.
10.
Carrie Allen McCray, "The Black Woman and Family Roles," in Black Woman, ed. La Frances Rodfers-Rose ( Beverly Hills: Sage Publications, 1980).
11.
The names for the characterizations are taken from the recording, Wild Is the Wind by Nina Simone and Gloria Naylor's The Women of Brewster Place ( New York: Penguin, 1983).
12.
"My skin is brown, My manner is tough. I'll kill the first mutha I see, my life has been rough. I'm awfully bitter these days, cause my parents were slaves. What do they call me? My name is Peaches." [ Nina Simone]
13.
Public education in America technically is free. The costs occur in trips for children, school supplies, and dress codes.
14.
The methodology used in self-hypnosis is the same as when Peaches conditions herself to absorb the mental and emotional blows distributed by America's social agencies.
15.
"Kiswana has still insisted on cutting her own hair, but it was so thin and finetextured, it refused to thicken even after she washed it. She never forgave Wilson for telling her she didn't look African." ( Naylor, The Women of Brewster Place, pp. 81-82]

-186-

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The Muslims of America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Religion in America Series *
  • The Muslims of America *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • Contributors *
  • Introduction- the Muslims of America 3
  • Notes 8
  • I- The Muslims of the United States *
  • 1- Muslim Organizations in the United States 11
  • Notes 24
  • 2- Estimate of Muslims Living in America 25
  • Notes 35
  • References 36
  • II- Perceptions of Muslims in the United States *
  • 3- Perspectives of American Churches on Islam and the Muslim Community in North America 39
  • Notes 49
  • 4- The Muslim as the "Other" 53
  • Notes 61
  • III- Islamic Thought in the United States *
  • 5- Ismail R. Al-Faruqi 65
  • Notes 78
  • 6- Seyyed Hossein Nasr 80
  • Notes 92
  • 7- The Legacy of Fazlur Rahman 96
  • Notes 105
  • IV- Islamic Activity in the United States *
  • 8- Political Activity of Muslims in America 111
  • Notes 123
  • 9- Da''Wa in the West 125
  • Notes 134
  • 10- Muslims in Prison 136
  • Notes 151
  • 11- Islamic Education in the United States and Canada 157
  • Notes 173
  • V- Muslim Women in Intercultural Perspective *
  • 12- African-American Muslim Women 177
  • Notes 186
  • 13- Two-Way Acculturation 188
  • Notes 200
  • VI- American Muslims and the Question of Identity *
  • 14- Islamic Issues for Muslims in the United States 205
  • Notes 215
  • 15- American Foreign Policy in the Middle East and Its Impact on the Identity of Arab Muslims in the United States 217
  • Notes 231
  • 16- Convergence and Divergence in an Emergent Community 236
  • Notes 248
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