Our Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln, John Brown, and the Civil War Era

By Stephen B. Oates | Go to book overview

FIVE
THE ENIGMA OF STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS

He had all the traits of a prize fighter. More than anything else, he loved a good political brawl, the give and take of floor battles, and pugnacious oratory. In 1834, in Jacksonville, Illinois, he gave a roaring defense of Andrew Jackson, after which a cheering crowd swept him triumphantly out of the meetinghouse. From then on he was known as the Little Giant. Few had his capacity to intimidate, to outrage. John Quincy Adams was utterly astonished when the five-feet, four-inch Illinoisian, in one of his first speeches in the national House of Representatives, ripped off his cravat, unbuttoned his waistcoat, and with contorted face and wild gestures "lashed himself into such a heat that if his body had been made of combustible matter, it would have burnt out."

Stephen A. Douglas was a man of the political arena, an improviser and tough little pragmatist who never had the time or the inclination for deep reflection. From the age of twenty-one until he died, he sought political power with headlong impetuosity and unrelenting ambition. He always worked too hard, drank too much, and smoked too many cigars. Political defeat often left him sick and miserably depressed, but he drove himself on nevertheless. Above all, he was a man of contradiction and paradox. A nationalist who detested abolitionists and secessionists with equal passion, he was a confirmed party man, convinced that America was safe only in Democratic hands. By turns, he was an Anglophobe, a foe of the Know-Nothings, a defender of alien rights, and a friend of the Mormons. Like most white Americans of his generation, he thought Negroes repugnant and inferior. Yet

-52-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Our Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln, John Brown, and the Civil War Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • One Styron's War Against the Blacks 1
  • Two God's Stone in the Pool of Slavery 9
  • Three John Brown and His Judges 22
  • Four Modern Radicals and John Brown 43
  • Five the Enigma of Stephen A. Douglas 52
  • Six Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation 61
  • Seven the Long Shadow of Lincoln 86
  • Eight Carl Sandburg's Lincoln 99
  • Nine Ghost Riders in the Sky 112
  • Ten Themes and Variations of a Civil War Trilogy 121
  • References 130
  • Index 144
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 150

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.