Running Steel, Running America: Race, Economic Policy and the Decline of Liberalism

By Judith Stein | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

While researching and writing this book, I have incurred a hefty debt to many institutions and individuals. I wish to thank the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Fund for the Study of Labor Relations Studies, the Lyndon B. Johnson Library, the City University Research Foundation, and the Eisner Fund at City College for providing the financial support and time off from teaching that allowed me to travel and write.

Presidential libraries are essential mines for every aspect of postwar history, but making good use of them requires expert guidance. The archivists at the Lyndon B. Johnson and Jimmy Carter libraries were especially helpful to me. President Richard M. Nixon's papers are at the National Archives repository in College Park, Maryland. I used them when they were in Alexandria, Virginia, where the staff, working under difficult circumstances, gave me knowledgeable, essential advice.

The National Archives was a crucial repository. Its collections of the records of the Department of Labor and the Office of Management and Budget were critical for tracking general policy as well as particular employment discrimination cases. Bill Creech was an expert guide to this material. Still, much material documenting the recent past remains in individual government departments, not in the Archives. Nelson Hermilla and Richard Ugelow at the Justice Department located critical files on the steel consent decrees of 1974. Elaine Bloomfield, a lawyer at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (eeoc), sent me a statistical breakdown of the impact of the consent decrees. Historian Hugh Graham generously gave me a copy of eeoc minutes, which had disappeared from the agency files. (Thanks to both of us, eeoc now has a copy.) Unfortunately, eeoc records are unorganized and difficult to use. Thomas J. Schlageter somehow located eeoc files on the steel industry for me.

Although the relevant records of steel companies are unavailable, the minutes of the board of director's meetings of the American Iron and Steel Institute, the industry's trade association, have recently been made available at the Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington, Delaware. Corporate documents and opinion turn up in congressional hearings and the records of all branches of the government, the union, and civil rights organizations. In addition, articles in the business and trade press were essential, especially those in Iron Age, American Metal Market, the Wall Street Journal,

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Running Steel, Running America: Race, Economic Policy and the Decline of Liberalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 410

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.