Running Steel, Running America: Race, Economic Policy and the Decline of Liberalism

By Judith Stein | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

I deposited my Alamo rental car at the Ramada Inn. The driver who shuttled me to the Birmingham airport for my return trip to New York was an African American man about nineteen or twenty years old. He told me that he had been a student at a local community college but that his real ambition was to work at USX's Fairfield steelworks. The mill, outside of Birmingham, had employed 27,000 workers during World War II. About 2,400 men and women worked there now.

I learned that he had grown up in Ishkooda, a nearby town adjacent to the U.S. Steel ore mines, which had employed his grandfather. Substituting Venezuelan ore for Alabaman, the corporation had closed its mines in the state in 1962. The United Steelworkers of America (USWA), which also represented the miners, had obtained jobs for the unemployed workers in the steel mills. His grandfather had transferred to Fairfield Steel, and his father now worked in the pipe mill, built in the 1980s to supply the booming oil business. He was biding his time with minimum-wage work, like the job with Alamo, until USX started hiring again. When I asked about the likelihood of his getting a job at the mill, he replied pensively, "Well, there are a lot of men on layoff."

Perhaps he will work for USX, train for something else, or remain a driver at Alamo. But his family's history is a variation of the story of many Alabama families, white as well as black. Other versions reach the newspapers in the form of crime statistics. Parents and grandparents in Birmingham puzzle over both the behavior and the futures of the current generation. Some of the

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Running Steel, Running America: Race, Economic Policy and the Decline of Liberalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 410

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.