Running Steel, Running America: Race, Economic Policy and the Decline of Liberalism

By Judith Stein | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
The Politics of Steel
Fundamentalism:
The Long 1950s

In 1951 Benjamin F. Fairless, chairman and CEO of U.S. Steel, proclaimed that the American steel industry "is bigger than those of all the other nations on earth put together." Fairless praised workers and managers, saying their joint achievement "stands as a glorious tribute to the men who make steel and the men who built steel in America." The causes were not as self-evident as the chairman implied, and his arithmetic was imperfect, but the supremacy was real. In that year, for the first time the industry produced over 100 million tons of steel, about 45 percent of the world's total output. Measured by technology, size, and efficiency, the United States was the leading global producer. Fairless, like the nation, had feared a return to the economic stagnation of the 1930s after World War II. But buoyant consumer demand and later the military spending that accompanied the Korean War dramatically altered gloomy forecasts, allowing the normally dour chairman to express the pride of the industry. 1

U.S. Steel itself accounted for nearly 30 percent of the nation's output, a sizable figure but lower than the two-thirds share it held earlier in the century. Over 250 companies made steel, but twelve controlled 80 percent of the capacity. These twelve, and other integrated firms, performed three operations: made pig-iron in blast furnaces, turned the iron into steel in open-hearth furnaces, and cast or rolled the steel into different shapes, such as sheets, plates, structural beams, rails, bars, and pipes. The execution of these three main operations on one site was the most efficient means of production. Some of

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Running Steel, Running America: Race, Economic Policy and the Decline of Liberalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 410

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.