Running Steel, Running America: Race, Economic Policy and the Decline of Liberalism

By Judith Stein | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TEN
An Industrial Policy for Steel?
The Decline of the Democratic Party

On November 27, 1979, less than a month after the EDA plan to save Wisconsin Steel collapsed, U.S. Steel announced that it was closing fifteen mills in eight states. The shutdowns included the Ohio and McDonald Works in Youngstown. Both had been on the chopping block in 1977, but William Kirwan, superintendent for the Youngstown works, had asked for time, and Edgar Speer's sentimental attachment to the place where his career began had saved both mills. There was no room now for decisions based on sentiment. By late 1979, the two facilities, which had opened in 1893, were producing only small orders for about 1,000 customers, all within 150 miles of Youngstown. Then the EPA had decided that the electrostatic precipitators that had been installed on open hearths in 1971 were not good enough. The high cost of transportation still had not been solved. Despite good management and good labor relations, the expenses of an integrated company that generated only the revenues of a minimill had put Ohio and McDonald in the red. 1

With the fifteen closings, U.S. Steel had eliminated about 3 percent of its raw steel capacity. All the closed mills were ones still making open hearth steel. At the finishing end, it closed the wire and plate mills at Fairfield, Alabama, the rod mill at Pittsburg, California, and a few others that were most affected by imports or located far from markets. All told, 13,000 workers lost their jobs. 2

The shutdowns were ordered by new leadership. Edgar Speer had left in

-253-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Running Steel, Running America: Race, Economic Policy and the Decline of Liberalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 410

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.