The Course of American Democratic Thought

By Ralph Henry Gabriel; Robert H. Walker | Go to book overview

PREFACE

IN THE SUMMER OF 1984, Greenwood Press approached me with a proposal to reprint The Course of American Democratic Thought. The second edition, published by Ronald Press, had remained in print until that press was absorbed by John Wiley and Sons, who kindly concede all rights to me.

Greenwood then raised the question of a new edition as opposed to a simple reprint. Because of the complicated and fascinating interplay between the events of the past thirty years and the American democratic faith, I unhesitatingly chose that option and invited Robert H. Walker to accept the initiative in preparing this third edition. Professor Walker is thoroughly familiar with my work. We have studied and taught together in Washington and Kyoto. His work on social change ( The Reform Spirit in America, 1976, 1985; Reform in America: the Continuing Frontier, 1985) has brought him in direct contact with the period and the issues.

Professor Walker and I have performed as co-authors. We have made only minor changes and corrections in the first twenty-eight chapters, updating the bibliography but letting the documentation stand. The last five chapters of this third edition, however, represent the addition of much new material coupled with revision and rearrangement of what was already there. The new materials result from Professor Walker's research and drafting; thus, in most respects, what is new about this edition is his.

Ralph Henry Gabriel

Hamden, Connecticut May, 1985

-ix-

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