The Strategy of Raw Materials: A Study of America in Peace and War

By Brooks Emeny | Go to book overview

TABLE 1
ECONOMIC WAR POTENTIAL*
DescriptionUnits g United
Kingdom
Rest of
British
Empire a
French
Empire a
Belgian
and
Dutch
Colonies
British
Empire
and Allied
Colonies
Germanyb Poland Denmark
and
Norway
Belgium,
Holland,
and
Luxemburg
France Italy
and
Albania
Germany,
Italy, and
Included
Countries u
Swedenand Baltic
States c
Balkans d Spain USSR USAWorldDescription
Population t millions 47-4 24.9e . . . . . . 72.3 90.7 34.5 6.7 7.3 42.0 44.1 235h 15.6 74.1 25.0 169.0 129.8 2,125.6 Population t
Population of de-
pendenciest
" . . . 449.6 70.0 77.8 597.4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.6 8.6 . . . . . . 1.0 . . . 16.0 . . . pendencies t
Tonnage of merchant
vessels
million
gross tons
17.8p 2.9p . . . 3.3n 24.0 4.2p .1p 5.7p . . . 2.9p 3.3p 16.2 2.6p 2.6p 1.2i 1.3p 11.9p 67.8p vessels
Railroads:
Railroads
good carried
billion ton-
kilometers
28.4p 96.5h . . . .9h 125.8 84.0h 19.9h 1.4h ? 35.1h 11.1h 151.5 31.6h 9.7 ? 354.8h 525.7h 1,237.0h goods carried
Motor vehicles in use
Motor vehicles in use
(end of 1938)f
Production
thousands 2,542 3,241 ... 80s 5,863 1,773 34s 225s 384s 2,461 389 5,266 248s 79s 182 678 29,212 42,912 (end of 1938)f
Production
Motor carsf "
million
493h 207h . . . . . . 700 364p . . . . . . 2 223p 75h 664 8 . . . ? 215p 4,809h 6,362h Motor carsf
Crude petroleum metric tons . . . 6.8 . . . . . .7.4p 14.2 1.2 .5 . . . . . . . . . .1 1.8 . . . 7.2h . . . 28.9p 172.9h 279.7h Crude petroleum
Gasoline . . . .5 2.5h . . . . . . 3.0 1.4 .1 . . . . . . 2.2 h .4 4.1 . . . 4h . . . 6.3h 60.7h ? Gasoline
Bituminous coal and
Bituminous coal and
anthracite
" 244.3h 68.9p 2.7p 1.5p 317.4 200.0p 38.1p .8r 4.2h 46.5p 1.0 330.6 .5 4.5 7.0k 132.9p 448.4h 1,307.41h anthracite
Lignite " 7.9i . . . . . . 7.9 207.0p . . . . . . .2 1.1 1.3p 209.6 . . . 17.8p .3 ? . . . 237.0p Lignite
Iron ore (metal con-
tent)
Iron ore (metal con-
tent)
" 4.3h 5.7h 1.8h . . . 11.8 4.0h .3p 1.0p 2.9h 11.5h .5 20.2 9.2h .6 1.2p 14.0i 37.3h 98.0h Pig-iron and ferro-
alloys
Pig-iron and ferro-
alloys
" 8.6h 3.9h . . . . . . 12.5 19.8p 1.0 .2 6.6h 7.9h .9 36.4 .7 .5 .5 14.7p 37.7h 104.0h Copper ore (metal
content)
Copper ore (metal
content)
thousand
metric tons
583.3 . . . 150.6h 734.3 31.0h . . . 22.6i . . . . . . 6 54.2 21.5h 42.0p 28.0h 95.5p 763.8h 2,348h Copper (smelter
Copper (smelter
product)
" 12.6k 457.2h . . . 150.6h 620.4 70.6p . . . 8.4i 90.3h 1.0 2.9p 173.2 19.7h 45.6p 12.0p 95.5p 820.3h 2,338h product)
Bauxite (crude ore) " 7m 395.9h 7.0h 591.3h 994.9 93.1h . . . . . . . . . 688.2h 386.5h 1,167.8 1,110.9p 2.5m 250.0h 427.0h ? Bauxite (crude ore)
Aluminum (smelter
Aluminum (smelter
product)
" 23.0p 64.0p . . . . . . 87.0 164.0p . . . 29.0p . . . 45.3p 25.8p 264.1 1.9 2.5p 1.3 49.0p 132.8h 581.9p product)
Zinc ore (metal con
Zinc ore (metal con-
tent)
" 7.7h 517.5h 17.6h 6.1h 548.9 172.9h 58.0h 8.8h 3.0 .9h 87.0p 330.6 37.3h 77.8h 35.0i 70.0h 568.2h 1,856h tent)
Cotton million
quintals
... 12.3h .2 .4 12.9 . . . . . . .1p .1 . . . .9p . . . 8.4p 41.1h 82.8h Cotton
Wool (greasy) metric tons 50.0p 770.6h 42.1h ? 862.7 21.2p 5.9p 3.2p 1.5 25.0h 15.9h 72.7 6.1h 101.9p 29.9i 137.6p 207.6p 1,780.0p Wool (greasy)
Rubber (crude) " . . . 606h 59p 43.9h 1,104 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ? . . . 1,158h Rubber (crude)
Wheat million
quintals
20.0p 255.8p 26.2p ? 302.0 78.1p 21.7p 5.3p 10.1p 94.0p 81.4p 290.6 13.5p 179.2p 43.0k 442.4h 253.3p 1,479.1h Wheat
Rye " . .1 3.0 .1p ? 3.2 108.8p 72.5p 2.9p 9.4p 8.0p 1.4 203.0 15.9p 22.5p 4.9k 213.6k 14.0p 461.2k Rye
Potatoes " 52.0p 55.2h 2.2h .5 109.9 712.8p 402.2h 21.8h 63.8p 158.8h 29.5 1,388.9 71.7p 66.0p 50.6k 697.4k 107.3h 2,215.0k Potatoes
Butter thousand
metric tons
54.4i 606.6i 7.0h ? 668.0 606.0h ? 195.5h 168.1h . . . 46.4 1,223.7 157.0h 30.5p 7.1m 187.8i 1,041.8p 3,350h Butter
Margarine " 211.6p 18.1i ? . . . 229.7 422.5q 2.9 136.3p 12.5p 207.7h 2.5 696.7 59.5h . . . . . . 69.2j 179.9h 1,350.0p Margarine
Beet sugar (refined million
Beet sugar (refined
equivalent)
quintals 5.3i 1.4 . . . . . . 6.7 28.0h 5.1h 2.1h 4.4h 8.7h 3.6p 51.9 3.9h 4.2p 2.3i 24.0h 15.3p 101.7h equivalent)
Cane sugar (refined
Cane sugar (refined
equivalent)
" . . . 50.0p 1.9 15.8p 67.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 ... 4.9p 179.9i equivalent)
Meat million
metric tons
1.4i 2.5h .2i ? 4.1 4.2p .8h .4 .7h 1.5i .7m 8.3 .4h .4h ? 4.5‡ 7.4p ? Meat
* The figures have partly been taken over from a table published by "The Economist",
London, September 2, 1939, partly assembled from the Statistical Yearbook of the League
of Nations, 1938/39
. Many of the data are based on estimates. In order to show the
maximum productive capacity of the different countries, the production figures are, in
nearly every case, those of the highest annual output achieved in the period 1936 to 1938.
Where several countries are grouped, the year taken is that of the highest output of the
largest producer in the group. The figures in the columns "British Empire and Allied
Colonies" and "Germany, Italy, and Invaded Countries" are simply sums of the figures
shown in the preceding columns (counting "?" as zero). The year used is indicated by
a footnote except for minor producers.
a Including mandated territories.
b Germany, Austria, and Czechoslovakia ( 1937 territory).
c Estonia, Finland; Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden.
d Bulgaria, Greece, Hungary, Rumania, Turkey, Yugoslavia.
e Dominions, excluding the colored population of South Africa, which is included
with dependencies.
fPrivate and commercial vehicles.
g metric quintal = 220.5 pounds; 1 metric ton = 1.1 U.S. short ton.h 1937.i 1936.J 1934.k 1935.m 1933.p 1938. 1930.
n, Dutch and Belgian tonnage.
q 1936 Germany only; Czechoslovakia produced nearly 70,000 tons in 1934.
rSpitzbergen.
s Automobiles registered January 1, 1938. (Source: Foreign Commerce Yearbook,
1938, 417-418.)
t Estimates for December 31, 1937.
+ Excluding Philippine Islands (about ten million tons in 1936-1937).
u Germany, Italy, and Albania, Belgium, Denmark, France, the Netherlands, Norway,
Poland.

-211-

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