She Stoops to Conquer

By Oliver Goldsmith; C. Moore Smith | Go to book overview

Marlow, who keeps the keys of our baggage. In the meantime, I'll go to prepare matters for our elopement. I have had the Squire's promise of a fresh pair of horses; and if I should not see him again, will write him further directions.

[Exit.

Miss Nev. Well, success attend you! In the meantime, I'll go amuse my aunt with the old pretence of a violent passion for my cousin. [Exit.

Enter MARLOW, followed by a SERVANT.

Marl. I wonder what Hastings could mean by sending me so valuable a thing as a casket to keep for him, when he knows the only place I have is the seat of a post-coach at an inn door. Have you deposited the casket with the landlady, as I ordered you? Have you put it into her own hands?

Serv. Yes, your honour.

Marl. She said she'd keep it safe, did she?

Serv. Yes; she said she'd keep it safe enough. She asked me how I came by it; and she said she had a great mind to make me give an account of myself.

[Exit SERVANT.

Marl. Ha! ha! ha! They're safe, however. What an unaccountable set of beings have we got amongst! This little barmaid, though, runs in my head most strangely, and drives out the absurdities of all the rest of the family. She's mine, she must be mine, or I'm greatly mistaken.

-82-

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She Stoops to Conquer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • [dedication] to Samuel Johnson, Ll.D. 5
  • Dramatis Personæ. - [the Cast of the Characters at Covent Garden in 1773.] 7
  • Prologue. 8
  • Act I 9
  • Act II 30
  • Act III 64
  • Act IV 82
  • Act V 104
  • Epilogue. 125
  • Epilogue, 127
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