The Quakers

By Hugh Barbour; J. William Frost | Go to book overview
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CADBURY, HENRY JOEL ( 1 December 1883, Philadelphia--7 October 1974, Bryn Mawr). Education: B.A. Haverford College, 1903; M.A., 1904, Ph.D., 1914, Harvard College. Career: Educator; teacher, University Latin School, Chicago, 1904; Westtown, 1905-8; Haverford College, 1910-18; Andover Theological Seminary, 1919-26; Bryn Mawr College, 1926-34; Hollis professor of divinity, Harvard College, 1934-54; chairman, American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), 1928-34, 1944-60; Revised Standard Version of the Bible Committee, 1929-52. (See Chapter 20.)

Henry Cadbury worked for peace, attempted to unite Friends, wrote Quaker history, and participated in the international academic community. He was born into an Orthodox Quaker family and attended Penn Charter School before going on to Haverford where he specialized in Greek and philosophy. The Ph.D. he received from Harvard was in philology. In 1910 Cadbury joined the Haverford College faculty. As a member of Twelfth Street Meeting in Philadelphia, he participated in the Young Friends Movement and in the peace conferences held by the Five Years Meeting. During World War I he became a founder of the AFSC and an effective organizer and publicist on its behalf. After Haverford College suspended him for writing a letter about peace to the Public Ledger in 1918, Cadbury accepted a position at Andover Theological Seminary in 1919. In 1923 he introduced to Americans the insights of Martin Dibelius and Rudolf Bultmann and the new technique of form criticism, and in The Making of Luke-- Acts ( 1927) he analyzed the writing style and major theses developed by Luke. In 1926 he became a professor of biblical literature at Bryn Mawr but in 1934 returned to Harvard. There he became a leader in the Cambridge Monthly Meeting and was instrumental in its affiliation with both the Five Years' Meeting and Friends General Conference. Throughout his life Cadbury lectured or wrote on peace issues and worked for the American Friends Service Committee. After

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