The Quakers

By Hugh Barbour; J. William Frost | Go to book overview

D

DOUGLAS, JOHN HENRY ( 27 November 1832, Fairfield, ME--24 November 1911, Whittier, CA). Education: Friends Boarding School, Providence, RI. Career: Itinerant revivalist; later pastor; first Iowa Yearly Meeting superintendent.

DOUGLAS, ROBERT WALTER November 1834, Fairfield, ME--18 February 1919, Versailles, OH). Education: Friends Boarding School, Providence, RI. Career: Itinerant revivalist; later pastor; banker.

In 1850 John Henry Douglas was converted during a storm at sea and moved from Maine to southwestern Ohio in 1853, followed by his parents (who had been on Providence Friends School staff) and his brother Robert, who kept a store and became a banker. Both brothers married Ohio women, were "recorded ministers," and became itinerant evangelists in 1860 in Ohio, reporting through Daniel Hill's Christian Worker, John Henry notably among Iowa Friends. His zeal impressed Walter Robson. In 1867 he was the first general secretary of the Peace Association of Friends in America and later helped in founding Wilmington College. He was inspired by Sheldon Jackson to evangelism in Oregon where he clashed with immigrant Friend William Hobson* in forming new congregations, which became Oregon (now Northwest) Yearly Meeting. In 1876 he was called as superintendent--the first among Friends--by Iowa Yearly Meeting, which he led in the calling of permanent pastors for most Meetings, and union revivals with other denominations. Poor health led to his early retirement to Whittier, California.

Robert Douglas in 1878 visited Friends in Hobart, Tasmania, and other settlements in Australia and New Zealand and returned to a pastorate at Wilmington, Ohio (see Chapter 16).

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