Exile's Return: A Literary Odyssey of the 1920s

By Malcolm Cowley; Donald W. Faulkner | Go to book overview

Appendix: Years of Birth

This is a list of writers born in the fifteen years from 1891 to 1905, inclusive, grouped by their years of birth. There are no critical judgments intended either by the inclusions or by the omissions. I started by listing all the American. writers in the given age group who were sufficiently prominent in 1942 to have their biographies included in that curious and useful book, Twentieth Century Authors (edited by Stanley J. Kunitz and Howard Haycraft). Then I added a few additional names, if I could find the years of birth in Who's Who or elsewhere: first, those of writers in the age group who had become prominent after 1942 (I must have missed some of them), and second, those of writers whose names were mentioned in my own narrative. Then, finding that the list had become too long and feeling that it was getting too far from literature proper, I omitted certain categories of authors: Western writers, mystery writers (except Dashiell Hammett, who had an effect on narrative technique; Raymond Chandlerhad one too, but was, born before 1890), popular romancers, one-book authors (unless the book was famous), scholars and scientists (except those like Crane Brinton and Margaret Mead who also write for the public), children's authors and writers on public affairs (except those who are also novelists or critics). Even in its shortened form the list seems to me a,pretty impressive record of literary activity.

1891   
Herbert Asbury, popular historian Lloyd Lewis, biographer
Margaret Culkin Banning, novelist Percy Marks, novelist
Lewis Gannett, critic Henry Miller, novelist, essayist
Maurice Hindus, novelist, reporter Elliot Paul, novelist
Sidney Howard, playwright Lyle Saxon, regional writer
Marquis James, biographer Harold Stearns, essayist
1892   
Djuna Barnes, novelist Pearl Buck, novelist
John Peale Bishop, poet, critic James M. Cain, novelist
Bessie Breuer, novelist Robert P. Tristram Coffin, poet

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