Shaping the Eighteenth Amendment: Temperance Reform, Legal Culture, and the Polity, 1880-1920

By Richard F. Hamm | Go to book overview

SOURCES AND TEXTUAL CONVENTIONS

The main sources for this study of the interaction of a social reform with the legal system are government records and the papers, both published and in manuscript, of the prohibition movement. Public documents, including court cases, government reports, legislative debates, and especially the unfortunately fragmentary records of the Internal Revenue Office in the Treasury Department proved invaluable. The papers of Congressman E. Yates Webb, Congressman Richmond P. Hobson, and Congressman Andrew J. Volstead supplied inside information on the fashioning of dry legislation.

The prohibition crusade's sources are incredibly rich. The microfilmed Temperance and Prohibition Papers, including many of the leading dry newspapers--Union Signal, Voice, New Voice, Lever, American Issue, American Patriot, and New Republic--were heavily mined. Randall C. Jimerson, Francis X. Blouin, and Charles A. Isetts , eds., The Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Temperance and Prohibition Papers ( Ann Arbor, University of Michigan, 1977), is indispensable for use ofthis collection. In addition to these materials, I supplemented manuscript sources of the temperance movement by examining a number of other collections: Virginia Anti- Saloon League Papers, Edwin C. Dinwiddie Papers, Oscar G. Christgau Papers, and Heriot Clarkson Papers. Of equal importance is the large number of temperance pamphlets and book-length publications.

As the notes indicate, I have relied on the numerous secondary sources on the temperance movement. Beyond the works cited in the notes, interested scholars are directed to Jacquie Jessup's bibliography in "Alcohol Reform and Society: The Liquor Issue in Social Context", ed. Jack Blocker Jr. ( Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1979), 259-79, and to the frequent additions to that bibliography published in the Social History of Alcohol Review.

In letting the prohibitionists, liquor supporters, government officials, and others express their ideas in their own words, I have encountered several textual difficulties. There is the frustrating problem of late-nineteenth- and early-twentiethcentury capitalization habits. Strictly preserving the capitalization within quotes became a nightmare, as no two writers emphasized the same words, so I have silently altered their capitalization to reflect modern conventions. The only exceptions to this rule are the rare documents--like the Constitution--in which the capitalization of certain words is familiar. The extensive use of short quotations also raised the perplexing issue of changing the case of letters at the opening of passages, and providing punctuation at the end of passages. I choose not to employ intrusive brackets, but rather have again silently altered the exact text. In no case do these alterations change the meaning. The rare insertions in the midst of quotes are set off in brackets, and any deletions are marked with ellipses.

To save space in the notes I have used two strategies. First, I have employed

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