British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan

By George Henry Nettleton; Arthur Eillicot Case | Go to book overview

For where, alas, should we our flight begin?

The foe's without; our parents are within. 95

BENZ. I'll fly to you, and you shall fly to me: Our flight but to each other's arms shall be.
To providence and chance permit the rest;
Let us but love enough, and we are blest. Exeunt.


(SCENE III]

Enter BOABDELIN, ABENAMAR, ABDELMELECH,
Guard; ZULEMA and HAMET, prisoners.

ABDELM. They're Lyndaraxa's brothers; for her
sake,
Their lives and pardon my request I make.

BOAB. Then, Zulema and Hamet, live; but know,
Your lives to Abdelmelech's suit you owe.

ZUL. The grace received so much my hope ex-

ceeds 5
That words come weak and short to answer deeds. You've made a venture, sir, and time must show
If this great mercy you did well bestow.

BOAB. You, Abdelmelech, haste before 'tis night,

And close pursue my brother in his flight. 10

Exeunt ABDELMELECH, ZULEMA, HAMET.

Enter ALMANZOR, ALMAHIDE, and ESPERANZA.
But see, with Almahide
The brave Almanzor comes, whose conquering
sword
That crown, it once took from me, has restored.
How can I recompence so great desert!

ALMANZ. I bring you, sir, performed in every

part, 15
My promise made; your foes are fled or slain;
Without a rival, absolute you reign.
Yet though, in justice, this enough may be,
It is too little to be done by me:
I beg to go 20
Where my own courage and your fortune calls,
To chase these misbelievers from our walls.
I cannot breathe within this narrow space;
My heart's too big, and swells beyond the place.

BOAB. You can perform, brave warrior, what you

please; 25
Fate listens to your voice, and then decrees. Now I no longer fear the Spanish pow'rs;
Already we are free, and conquerors.

ALMANZ. Accept, great king, tomorrow, from my
hand,

The captive head of conquered Ferdinand. 30

You shall not only what you lost regain,
But o'er the Biscayn mountains to the main,
Extend your sway, where never Moor did reign.

ABEN. What, in another, vanity would seem,

Appears but noble confidence in him; 35
No haughty boasting, but a manly pride; A soul too fiery, and too great a guide:
He moves eccentric, like a wand'ring star,
Whose motion's just, though 'tis not regular.

BOAB. It is for you, brave man, and only you, 40
Greatly to speak, and yet more greatly do. But, if your benefits too far extend,
I must be left ungrateful in the end:
Yet somewhat I would pay,
Before my debts above all reck'ning grow, 45
To keep me from the shame of what I owe.
But you --
Are conscious to yourself of such desert,
That of your gift I fear to offer part.

ALMANZ. When I shall have declared my high

request, 50
So much presumption there will be confessed, That you will find your gifts I do not shun,
But rather much o'er-rate the service done.

BOAB. Give wing to your desires, and let 'em fly,

Secure they cannot mount a pitch too high. 55
So bless me Allah both in peace and war, As I accord whate'er your wishes are.

ALMANZ. (putting one knee on the ground). Em-
boldened by the promise of a prince,
I ask this lady now with confidence.

BOAB. You ask the only thing I cannot grant. 60

(The KING and ABENAMAR look amazedly on
each other
.)

But, as a stranger, you are ignorant
Of what by public fame my subjects know;
She is my mistress.

ABEN. -- And my daughter too.

ALMANZ. Believe, old man, that I her father knew:

What else should make Almanzor kneel to you? 65

Nor doubt, sir, but your right to her was known:
For had you had no claim but love alone,
I could produce a better of my own.

ALMAH. (softly to him). Almanzor, you forget my
last request:
Your words have too much haughtiness ex-

pressed. 70
Is this the humble way you were to move?

ALMANZ. (to her). I was too far transported by my
love.
Forgive me; for I had not learned to sue
To anything before, but heav'n and you.

Sir, at your feet, I make it my request -- 75

(To the KING. First line kneeling: second,
rising, and boldly
.)

Though, without boasting, I deserve her best;
For you her love with gaudy titles sought,
But I her heart with blood and dangers bought.

BOAB. The blood which you have shed in her
defence

____________________
SCENE III] QQF make no scene-division; S begins Scene II.
13] Q4Q5F The crown.
58] Q4Q5F read to for on in s.d.

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 960

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.