British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan

By George Henry Nettleton; Arthur Eillicot Case | Go to book overview

A token that with my dying breath I blest her, 110
And the dear little infant left behind me. I am sick -- I am quiet -- (JAFFEIR dies.)

OFFIC. Bear this news to the Senate,
And guard their bodies till there's farther order.
Heav'n grant I die so well --

(Scene shuts upon them.)


[SCENE IV]
[A room in PRIULI'S house.]

Soft music. Enter BELVIDERA distracted, led by two of her Women, PRIULI, and Servants.

PRIU. Strengthen her heart with patience, pitying heav'n.

BELV. Come, come, come, come, come! Nay, come to bed,
Prithee, my love. The winds! hark, how they whistle!
And the rain beats: oh, how the weather shrinks me!

You are angry now; who cares? pish, no indeed. 5
Choose then. I say you shall not go, you shall not! Whip your ill nature; get you gone then! --

(JAFFEIR'S Ghost rises.)

Oh,
Are you returned? See, father, here he's come again!
Am I to blame to love him? Oh, thou dear one!

(Ghost sinks.)

Why do you fly me? Are you angry, still, then? 10
Jaffeir! where art thou? -- Father, why do you do thus?
Stand off, don't hide him from me! He's here some-where.
Stand off, I say! -- What, gone? Remember't, tyrant!
I may revenge myself for this trick one day.
I'll do't -- I'll do't. Renault's a nasty fellow. 15
Hang him, hang him, hang him!

Enter Officer and others.

PRIU. News -- what news?

(Officer whispers PRIULI.)

OFFIC. Most sad, sir.
Jaffeir, upon the scaffold, to prevent
A shameful death, stabbed Pierre, and next himself:
Both fell together.

PRIU. -- Daughter --

(The Ghosts of JAFFEIR and PIERRE rise together, both bloody.)

BELV. Hah, look there! 20
My husband bloody, and his friend, too! Murder! Who has done this? Speak to me, thou sad vision;
On these poor trembling knees I beg it.

(Ghosts sink.)
Vanished --

Here they went down. Oh, I'll dig, dig the den up.

You shan't delude me thus. Hoa, Jaffeir, Jaffeir! 25
Peep up and give me but a look. -- I have him! I've got him, father; oh, now how I'll smuggle him!
My love! my dear! my blessing! help me, help me!
They have hold on me, and drag me to the bottom!
Nay -- now they pull so hard -- farewell --

(She dies.)

MAID. She's dead -- 30
Breathless and dead.

PRIU. Then guard me from the sight on't: Lead me into some place that's fit for mourning;
Where the free air, light, and the cheerful sun
May never enter. Hang it round with black;

Set up one taper that may last a day -- 35
As long as I've to live; and there all leave me, Sparing no tears when you this tale relate,
But bid all cruel fathers dread my fate.

Curtain falls. Exeunt omnes.

____________________
36]Q2Q3 omit all.

-149-

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