Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan

By George Henry Nettleton; Arthur Eillicot Case | Go to book overview

desire him to lend you a thousand pounds. 200
I'll engage you prosper.

Y. FAS. 'Sdeath and Furies! why was that coxcomb thrust into the world before me? O Fortune -- Fortune -- thou art a bitch, by Gad!

Exeunt.


SCENE [III]

A dressing-room.

Enter LORD FOPPINGTONin his night-gown.1

L. FOP. Page!

Enter Page.

PAGE. Sir.

L. FOP. 'Sir!' Pray, sir, do me the favor to teach your tongue the title the king has thought fit to

honor me with. 5

PAGE. I ask your lordship's pardon, my lord.

L. FOP. Oh, you can pronounce the word, then; I thought it would have choked you. D'ye hear?

PAGE. My lord.

L. FOP. Call La Vérole; I would dress -- 10

Exit Page.

(Solus.) Well, 'tis an unspeakable pleasure to be a man of quality ----- strike me dumb! ----- 'My lord!' ----- 'Your lordship!' ----- 'My Lord Foppington!' ----- Ah! c'est quelque chose de beau, que le

diable m'emporte.2 Why, the ladies were ready 15
to puke at me, whilst I had nothing but Sir Navelty to recommend me to 'em. Sure, whilst I was but a knight, I was a very nauseous fellow. Well, 'tis ten thousand pawnd well given ----- stap my
vitals ----- 20

Enter LA VÉROLE.

[L. V.] Me Lord, de shoemaker, de tailor, de hosier, de sempstress, de barber, be all ready, if your lordship please to be dress.

L. FOP. 'Tis well; admit 'em.

L. V. Hey, messieurs, entrez. 25

Enter Tailor, etc.

L. FOP. So, gentlemen, I hope you have all taken pains to show yourselves masters in your professions.

TAI. I think I may presume to say, sir -----

L. V. 'My lord' ----- you clawn, you!

TAI. Why, is he made a lord? ----- My lord, 30
I ask your lordship's pardon, my lord; I hope, my lord, your lordship will please to own, I have brought your lordship as accomplished a suit of clothes as ever peer of England trode the stage in,3 my lord: will your lordship please to try 'em now? 35

L. FOP. Ay, but let my people dispose the glasses so, that I may see myself before and behind; for I love to see myself all raund -----

Whilst he puts on his clothes, enter YOUNG FASHION and LORY.

Y. FAS. Hey-dey, what the devil have we here?

Sure my gentleman's grown a favorite at Court, 40
he has got so many people at his levee.

LO. Sir, these people come in order to make him a favorite at Court; they are to establish him with the ladies.

Y. FAS. Good God! to what an ebb of taste 45
are women fallen, that it should be in the power of a laced coat to recommend a gallant to 'em -----

LO. Sir, tailors and periwig-makers are now become the bawds of the nation: 'tis they debauch all

the women. 50

Y. FAS. Thou sayest true; for there's that fop now, has not by nature wherewithal to move a cook- maid, and by that time these fellows have done with him, i'gad, he shall melt down a countess. But now

for my reception: I'll engage it shall be as cold a 55
one, as a courtier's to his friend, who comes to put him in mind of his promise.

L. FOP. (to his tailor). Death and eternal tartures! Sir, I say the packet's too high by a foot.

TAI. My lord, if it had been an inch lower it 60
would not have held your lordship's pocket-handkerchief.

L. FOP. Rat my pocket-handkerchief! Have not I a page to carry it? You may make him a packet

up to his chin a purpose for it; but I will not have 65
mine come so near my face.

TAI. 'Tis not for me to dispute your lordship's fancy.

Y. FAS. (to LORY). His lordship! Lory, did you

observe that? 70

LO. Yes, sir; I always thought 'twould end there. Now, I hope, you'll have a little more respect for him.

Y. FAS. Respect! Damn him for a coxcomb; now has he ruined his estate to buy a title, that he

may be a fool of the first rate. But let's accost 75
him. (To LORD FOPPINGTON.) Brother, I'm your humble servant.

L. FOP. O Lard, Tam; I did not expect you in England: brother, I am glad to see you. ----- (Turn

ing to his tailor.) Look you, sir, I shall never be 80
reconciled to this nauseous packet; therefore pray get me another suit with all manner of expedition, for this is my eternal aversion. Mrs. Callicoe, are not you of my mind?

SEM. Oh, directly, my lord; it can never be 85
too low --

____________________
3]Q1 Sir, Pray Sir do; Q2 P Sir; Pray, Sir, do.
10]Q2 P Varole (throughout the scene).
23]Q2 P om. be.
34]Q2 P trod.
1
Dressing-gown.
2
Ah! that's something fine, devil take me.
3
Gentlemen often sat on the stage at this time.

-268-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 960

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.