British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan

By George Henry Nettleton; Arthur Eillicot Case | Go to book overview

MYRT. Hush! 'tis I, 'tis I your lover -- Myrtle himself, madam.

LUC. Oh, bless me! what a rashness and 85
folly to surprise me so! -- but hush! -- my mother.

Enter MRS. SEALAND, CIMBERTON, and PHILLIS.

MRS. SEAL. How now! what's the matter?

LUC. O madam! as soon as you left the room my uncle fell into a sudden fit, and -- and -- so I cried

out for help to support him and conduct him 90
to his chamber.

MRS. SEAL. That was kindly done. -- Alas, sir! how do you find yourself?

MYRT. Never was taken in so odd a way in my

life -- pray, lead me! Oh! I was talking here 95
-- pray carry me -- to my cousin Cimberton's young lady --

MRS. SEAL (aside). My cousin Cimberton's young lady! How zealous he is, even in his extremity, for

the match! -- a right1 Cimberton! 100

( CIMBERTONand LUClNDAlead him as one in pain, etc.)

CIMB. Pox! Uncle, you will pull my ear off.

LUC. Pray, uncle! you will squeeze me to death.

MRS. SEAL. No matter, no matter -- he knows not what he does. -- Come, sir, shall I help you out?

MYRT. By no means! I'll trouble nobody 105
but my young cousins here. They lead him off.

PHIL. But pray, madam, does your ladyship intend that Mr. Cimberton shall really marry my young mistress at last? I don't think he likes her.

MRS. SEAL. That's not material. Men of 110
his speculation are above desires. But be it as it may, now I have given old Sir Geoffry the trouble of coming up to sign and seal, with what countenance can I be off?

PHIL. As well as with twenty others, madam. 115
It is the glory and honor of a great fortune to live in continual treaties, and still to break off. It looks great, madam.

MRS. SEAL. True, Phillis -- yet to return our

blood again into the Cimbertons' is an honor 120
not to be rejected. -- But were not you saying that Sir John Bevil's creature, Humphrey, has been with Mr. Sealand?

PHIL. Yes, madam; I overheard them agree that

Mr. Sealand should go himself and visit this un­ 125
known lady that Mr. Bevil is so great with; and if he found nothing there to fright him, that Mr. Bevil should still marry my young mistress.

MRS. SEAL. How! nay, then, he shall find she is

my daughter as well as his. I'll follow him 130
this instant and take the whole family along with me. The disputed power of disposing of my own daughter shall be at an end this very night. I'll live no longer in anxiety for a little hussy that hurts my appearance
wherever I carry her, and for whose sake I seem 135
to be [not] at all regarded, and that in the best of my days.

PHIL. Indeed, madam, if she were married, your ladyship might very well be taken for Mr. Sealand's

daughter. 140

MRS. SEAL. Nay, when the chit has not been with me, I have heard the men say as much I'll no longer cut off the greatest pleasure of a woman's life -- the shining in assemblies -- by her forward antici

pation of the respect that's due to her superior; 145
she shall down to Cimberton Hall -- she shall -- she shall!

PHIL. I hope, madam, I shall stay with your ladyship.

MRS. SEAL. Thou shalt, Phillis, and I'll place 150
thee then more about me. But order chairs immediately -- I'll be gone this minute. Exeunt.


SCENE [II]

Charing Cross.

Enter MR. SEALANDand HUMPHREY.

MR. SEAL. I am very. glad, Mr. Humphrey, that you agree with me that it is for our common good I should look thoroughly into this matter.

HUMPH. I am, indeed, of that opinion; for there

is no artifice, nothing concealed, in our family, 5
which ought in justice to be known. I need not desire you, sir, to treat the lady with care and respect.

MR. SEAL. Master Humphrey, I shall not be rude, though I design to be a little abrupt and come into

the matter at once, to see how she will bear upon 10
a surprise.

HUMPH. That's the door, sir; I wish you success.-- (While HUMPHREYspeaks [aside], SEALANDconsults his table book.2) I am less concerned what happens

there because I hear Mr. Myrtle is well lodged as 15
old Sir Geoffry; so I am willing to let this gentleman employ himself here, to give them time at home; for I am sure 'tis necessary for the quiet of our family Lucinda were disposed of out of it, since Mr. Bevil's
inclination is so much otherwise engaged. Exit. 20

MR. SEAL. I think this is the door. (Knocks.) I'll carry this matter with an air of authority, to enquire, though I make an errand to begin discourse. (Knocks again, and enter a Foot-boy.) So, young

man! is your lady within? 25

BOY. Alack, sir! I am but a country boy -- I dan't know whether she is or noa; but an you'll stay a bit, I'll goa and ask the gentlewoman that's with her.

____________________
1
True.
136]
1735, 1741 not at all; all earlier eds. om. not.
2
Memorandum-book.

-467-

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