British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan

By George Henry Nettleton; Arthur Eillicot Case | Go to book overview
AIR XXIII. All in a misty morning, &c.

AIR XXIII. All in a misty morning.

Before the barn-door crowing,

The cock by hens attended, 95
His eyes around him throwing, Stands for a while suspended.
Then one he singles from the crew,
And cheers the happy hen;
With how do you do, and how do you do, 100
And how do you do again.

MACH. Ah Jenny! thou art a dear slut.

TRULL. Pray, madam, were you ever in keeping?

TAWD. I hope, madam, I han't been so long upon

the town, but I have met with some good for­ 105
tune as well as my neighbors.

TRULL. Pardon me, madam, I meant no harm by the question; 'twas only in the way of conversation.

TAWD. Indeed, madam, if I had not been a fool, I

might have lived very handsomely with my last 110
friend. But upon his missing five guineas, he turned me off. Now I never suspected he had counted them.

SLAM. Who do you look upon, madam, as your best sort of keepers?

TRULL. That, madam, is thereafter as they 115
be.

SLAM. I, madam, was once kept by a Jew; and bating their religion, to women they are a good sort of people.

TAWD. Now for my part, I own I like an old 120
fellow; for we always make them pay for what they can't do.

VIX. A spruce prentice, let me tell you, ladies, is no ill thing: they bleed freely. I have sent at least

two or three dozen of them in my time to the 125
plantations.

JENNY. But to be sure, sir, with so much good fortune as you have had upon the road, you must be grown immensely rich.

MACH. The road, indeed, hath done me jus­ 130
tice, but the gaming-table hath been my ruin.

AIR XXIV. When once I lay with another man's wife.

AIR XXIV. When once I lay with another man's wife.

JENNY. The gamesters and lawyers are jugglers alike,
If they meddle, your all is in danger:
Like gypsies, if once they can finger a souse,1
Your pockets they pick, and they pilfer your

house, 135
And give your estate to a stranger.

A man of courage should never put anything to the risk but his life. (She takes up his pistol.) These are the tools of a man of honor. Cards and dice are only

fit for cowardly cheats, who prey upon their 140
friends. (TAWDRY takes up the other [pistol].)

TAWD. This, sir, is fitter for your hand. Besides your loss of money, 'tis a loss to the ladies. Gaming takes you off from women. How fond could I be of

you! but before company, 'tis ill-bred. 145

MACH. Wanton hussies!

JENNY. I must and will have a kiss to give my wine a zest.

(They take him about the neck, and make signs to PEACHUM and Constables, who rush in upon him.)


SCENE V

To them, PEACHUM and Constables.

PEACH. I seize you, sir, as my prisoner.

MACH. Was this well done, Jenny? -- Women are decoy ducks; who can trust them! Beasts, jades, jilts, harpies, furies, whores!

PEACH. Your case, Mr. Macheath, is not par­ 5
ticular. The greatest heroes have been ruined by women. But, to do them justice, I must own they ire a pretty sort of creatures, if we could trust them. You must now, sir, take your leave of the ladies, and
if they have a mind to make you a visit, they will 10
be sure to find you at home. The gentleman, ladies, lodges in Newgate. Constables, wait upon the captain to his lodgings.

AIR XXV. When firft I laid fiege to my chloris.

100-101] Q (in engraved music) d' you don and how d' you do and how d' you do. 13138] O1 om. A man . . . life.

____________________
1
Lay hands an a sou.

-550-

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