British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan

By George Henry Nettleton; Arthur Eillicot Case | Go to book overview
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our own affairs, therefore let us have no more 60
whimpering or whining.

AIR LVI. A cobbler there was, etc.

Ourselves, like the great, to secure a retreat,
When matters require it, must give up our gang:

And good reason why,

Or, instead of the fry, 65
Ev'n Peachum and I,
Like poor petty rascals, might hang, hang;
Like poor petty rascals might hang.

PEACH. Set your heart at rest, Polly. Your hus

band is to die today. Therefore, if you are not 70
already provided, 'tis high time to look about for another. There's comfort for you, you slut.

LOCK. We are ready, sir, to conduct you to the Old Bailey.

AIR LVII. Bonny Dundee.

MACH. The charge is prepared; the lawyers are

met, 75
The judges all ranged (a terrible show!) I go, undismayed -- for death is a debt,
A debt on demand. So, take what I owe. Then farewell, my love -- dear charmers, adieu!
Contented I die -- 'tis the better for you. 80
Here ends all dispute the rest of our lives, For this way at once I please all my wives. Now, gentlemen, I am ready to attend you.


SCENE XII

LUCY, POLLY, FILCH.

POLLY. Follow them, Filch, to the court. And when the trial is over, bring me a particular account of his behavior, and of everything that happened. You'll find me here with Miss Lucy. Exit FILCH.

But why is all this music? 5

LUCY. The prisoners whose trials are put off till next session are diverting themselves.

POLLY. Sure there is nothing so charming as music! I'm fond of it to distraction! -- But alas! now, all

mirth seems an insult upon my affliction. -- Let 10
us retire, my dear Lucy, and indulge our sorrows. The noisy crew, you see, are coming upon us. Exeunt.

A dance of prisoners in chains, etc.


SCENE XIII

The condemned hold.

MACHEATH, in a melancholy posture.

AIR LVIII. Happy groves.

O cruel, cruel, cruel case!
Must I suffer this disgrace?

AIR LIX. Of all the girls that are so smart.

Of all the friends in time of grief,
When threat'ning death looks grimmer,

Not one so sure can bring relief, 5
As this best friend, a brimmer. (Drinks.)

AIR LVI] 01 (some copies) om. Entire air.

-566-

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