British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan

By George Henry Nettleton; Arthur Eillicot Case | Go to book overview
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HAR. From other designs I can be nowhere 235
so secure as with my father.

CHAR. Time flies. Let me persuade you!

HAR. I am resolved to stay here.

CHAR. You distract me. For heaven's sake --

HAR. I will not think of it. 240

CHAR. Consider, my angel!

HAR. I do consider, that your conduct has made it absolutely improper for me to trust myself to your care.

CHAR. My conduct! Vexation! 'Sdeath! 245 But then, my dear Harriot, the danger you are in, the necessity --

Enter CHAMBERMAID.

CHAMB. Oh law, ma'am! such a terrible accident! As sure as I am here, there's a press-gang has seized

the two gemmin, and is carrying them away, 250
thof so be one an'em says as how he's a knight and baronight, and that t'other's a 'squire and a housekeeper.

HAR. Seized by a press-gang! Impossible.

CHAR. Oh, now the design comes out. But 255
I'll balk his lordship.

CHAMB. Lack-a-dasy, ma'am, what can we do? There is master, and John Ostler, and Bootcatcher, all gone a'ter 'em. There is such an uproar as never

was! Exit. 260

HAR. If I thought this was your contrivance, sir, I would never speak to you again.

CHAR. I would sooner die than be guilty of it. This is Lord Trinket's doing, I am sure. I knew he

had some scheme in agitation, by a letter I 265
intercepted this morning.

HAR. Ah! (Screams.)

CHAR. Ha! here he comes! Nay, then, it's plain enough. Don't be frighted, my love! I'll protect

you. But now I must desire you to follow 270
my directions.

Enter LORD TRINKET.

L. TRINK. Now, madam! Pox on't, he here again! Nay, then! (Drawing.) Come, sir! You're unarmed, I see. Give up the lady: give her up, I say;

or I am through you in a twinkling. 275

(Going to make a pass at CHARLES.)

CHAR. Keep your distance, my lord! I have arms. (Producing a pistol.) If you come a foot nearer, you have a brace of balls through your lordship's head.

L. TRINK. How? what's this? pistols! 280

CHAR. At your lordship's service. Sword and pistol, my lord! Those, you know, are our weapons. If this misses, I have the fellow to't in my pocket. Don't be frighted, madam! His lordship

has removed your friends and relations, but 285
he will take great care of you. Shall I leave you with him?

HAR. Cruel Charles! You know I must go with you now.

CHAR. A little away from the door, if your 290
lordship pleases. (Waving his hand.)

L. TRINK. Sir! 'Sdeath! Madam!

CHAR. A little more round, my lord! (Waving.)

L. TRINK. But, sir! Mr. Oakly!

CHAR. I have no leisure to talk with your 295
lordship now. A little more that way, if you please. (Waving.) You know where I live. If you have any commands for Miss Russet, you will hear of her too at my house. Nay, keep back, my lord! (Present
ing.) Your lordship's most obedient humble 300
servant! Exit with HARRIOT.

Manet LORD TRINKET.

(Looking after him, and pausing for a short time.)

[L. TRINK.] I cut a mighty ridiculous figure here, 'pon honor. So, I have been concerting this deep scheme merely to serve him. Oh, the devil take such

intrigues, and all silly country girls, that can 305
give up a man of quality and figure, for a fellow that nobody knows! Exit.


ACT V

SCENE [I]

LADY FREELOVE'S.

Enter LORD TRINKET, LADY FREELOVEwith a letter, and CAPTAIN O'CUTTER.

L. TRINK. Was ever anything so unfortunate? Pox on't, captain, how could you make such a strange blunder?

O'CUT. I never tought of a blunder. I was to

daliver two letters, and if I gave them one 5
a-piece I tought it was all one, fait.

L. FREE. And so, my lord, the ingenious captain gave the letter intended for me to young Oakly, and here he has brought me a challenge.

L. TRINK. Ridiculous! Never was anything 10 so mal-à-propos. Did not you read the direction, captain?

O'CUT. Who, me! Devil burn me, not I. I never rade at all.

L. TRINK. 'Sdeath, how provoking! When I 15
had secured the servants, and got all the people out of the way; when everything was en train!

L. FREE. Nay, never despair, my lord! Things have happened unluckily, to be sure; and yet, I

think I could hit upon a method to set every­ 20
thing right again.

____________________
267] OO omit Ah!
21] OO to right.

-704-

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British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan
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