British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan

By George Henry Nettleton; Arthur Eillicot Case | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE *

TO BE SPOKEN IN THE CHARACTER OF TONY LUMPKIN

BY J. CRADOCK,1 ESQ.

Well -- now all's ended -- and my comrades gone,
Pray what becomes of mother's nonly2 son?
A hopeful blade! -- in town I'll fix my station,
And try to make a bluster in the nation.

As for my cousin Neville, I renounce her, 5
Off, in a crack, I'll carry big Bet Bouncer. Why should not I in the great world appear?
I soon shall have a thousand pounds a year;
No matter what a man may here inherit,
In London -- 'gad, they've some regard to spirit, 10
I see the horses prancing up the streets,
And big Bet Bouncer bobs to all she meets;
Then hoikes to jigs and pastimes ev'ry night --
Not to the plays -- they say it a'n't polite;
To Sadler's Wells, perhaps, or operas go, 15
And once, by chance, to the roratorio. Thus here and there, forever up and down,
We'll set the fashions, too, to half the town;
And then at auctions -- money ne'er regard --
Buy pictures, like the great, ten pounds a yard; 20
Zounds! we shall make these London gentry say,
We know what's damned genteel, as well as they.

____________________
*
THIS CAME TOO LATE TO BE SPOKEN.
1
Joseph Cradock [OO Craddock] ( 1742-1826), Goldsmith's friend, whose tragedy, Zobeide, had appeared in 1771.
2
Tony's lingo, not a misprint. He continues to speak in 'character.'

-798-

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