Controlling Nuclear Weapons: Democracy versus Guardianship

By Robert Dahl | Go to book overview

2
The Case for Guardianship

APERENNIAL ALTERNATIVE to democracy is government by meritocratic rulers 1 or guardians.Most beautifully and enduringly presented by Plato in The Republic2 the idea of guardianship has exerted a powerful pull throughout human history.Although it is often used in its most vulgar form as a rationalization for corrupt, brutal, and inept authoritarian regimes of all kinds, the argument for it does not fall simply because it has been badly abused. If we were to apply the same harsh test to democratic ideas they too would be found wanting. We should confront the case for guardianship without employing guilt by association to undermine its appeal at the outset.


VISIONS OF GUARDIANSHIP

The idea of guardianship has appealed to a great variety of political thinkers and leaders in many different guises and in many different parts of the world over most of recorded history. If Plato provides perhaps the most familiar example, the practical ideal of Confucius, who was born more than a century before Plato, has had far more profound influence over many more people and persists to the present day, deeply embedded in the cultures of sev

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Controlling Nuclear Weapons: Democracy versus Guardianship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Frank W. Abrams Lectures *
  • Controlling Nuclear Weapons - Democracy Versus Guardianship *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • I Obstacles to Democratic Control 5
  • 2 the Case for Guardianship 19
  • 3 a Critique of Guardianship 33
  • 4 is Political Equality Justified? 53
  • 5 Vision of a Possible Future 69
  • Appendixes 91
  • Notes 95
  • Bibliography 105
  • Index 109
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