A Tradition That Has No Name: Nurturing the Development of People, Families, and Communities

By Mary Field Belenky; Lynne A. Bond et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The Listening Partners (LP) program was supported by grants awarded to Lynne A. Bond and Mary Field Belenky from the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health of the Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (#MCJ-500541, October 1, 1986, to June 1, 1991), the A. L. Mailman Family Foundation, and the Bendheim Foundation. We are indebted to all of the mothers who participated in this project. The group co-leaders--Jean Lathrop, Laura Latham Smith, and Ann Dunn--played key roles in the program design and implementation. The Lamoille Family Center in Morrisville, Vermont, sponsored and housed the program. Toni Cook, Eric Piirak, Patricia Burgmeier, Mary Sue Rowley, and David Howell helped with aspects of the research component. Ann Stanton spent a sabbatical year helping us analyze the data and think about the implications of our findings. Nevitt Sanford's support and encouragement led us to believe that a project like this was possible.

The Public Homeplace study was supported by the A. L. Mailman Family Foundation, the Green Mountain Fund for Popular Struggle, the Needmore Fund, and the late Virginia Stranahan. Elaine van der Stok was a dedicated transcriber of the interviews.

For an understanding of the Mothers' Center movement in the United States, we are indebted to the founder Patsy Turrini and Lorri Slepian, a leader of the organization for many years. Other founding members who helped us understand the early history include Phyllis Adler, Kathy Dolengewicz, Linda Itzkowtiz, Jane Maddalena-Barbieri, the late Joanne Magnus, Margaret Milch, and Wendy Wilson. Current members and staff who helped us understand the organization as it is today include: Ginni Allfrey, Maggie Cole, Suzanne Feingold, Brenda Kelly, Linda Landsman, Teresa Magee, Jeanette Mattar, Pam Mele, Mary Beth Merritt, Pam Reardon, Lynne Ritucci, Nancy Shaw, Michelle Todesca, and Sue Wald.

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