A Tradition That Has No Name: Nurturing the Development of People, Families, and Communities

By Mary Field Belenky; Lynne A. Bond et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
THE MOTHERS' CENTER MOVEMENTS

We wanted to create a public space where women would be able to reflect on what it means to be a mother. There is no space in society for this.

HILDEGARD SCHOOS FOUNDER, THE MOTHERS' CENTER, GERMANY

Mothers need a place where they can give voice to what they need and have that voice validated.

PATSY TURRINI FOUNDER, THE MOTHERS' CENTER, UNITED STATES

In technologically advanced societies mothers who work full-time in the home have become increasingly isolated and excluded. More than ever, women raising children are likely to feel like an Other--left out and deficient. While some sense of exclusion is felt by most mothers, the experience has been particularly intense for the many women who try to raise children outside of any real community: affluent mothers living in suburban areas whose most intimate community facility might be the shopping mall, urban mothers bringing up children in anonymous buildings often set in violent and deteriorating neighborhoods, mothers living in rural areas depopulated and demoralized by the waning of an agrarian way of life. Now that so many women are in the professions, any woman who leaves to raise children is likely to feel her status in society slipping away. When she meets former colleagues, she often finds eyes glazing over and the conversations stilted. In the United States, government programs and policies can be destructive to poor families. Under some circumstances a father must abandon the family before the government will provide economic assistance for his children. The women are then stigmatized as single mothers and by their dependency on public welfare.

-180-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Tradition That Has No Name: Nurturing the Development of People, Families, and Communities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.