Labor Economics: Theory, Institutions, and Public Policy

By Ray Marshall; Vernon M. Briggs Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
American Trade Unionism: Present and Future

Since the merger of the AFL-CIO in 1955, the trade union movement has entered a new phase of its evolutionary development. Highlights of this period include passage of federal legislation to govern the internal affairs of trade unions; concern over the influences of corruption and racketeering in some unions; a social revolution pertaining to the treatment of minorities and women; dramatic changes in the work force due to the increased participation of women; demographic transformations; technological developments and structural shifts in the demand for labor; declining public support for unions; intensified international competition; the spread of multinational corporations; and the institutionalization of more subtle union avoidance methods by employers. This chapter will discuss these and related matters in order to identify the contemporary status of trade unionism in American society. It will also speculate about the future prospects for the nation's labor movement.

Before addressing particular issues, it is necessary to discuss briefly the dominant labor organization of this period -- the AFL-CIO -- as well as the structural relationships between the different layers of the labor movement.


STRUCTURE OF THE AFL-CIO

The organizational structure of the AFL-CIO, outlined in Figure 12-1, closely resembles that of the old AFL. The AFL-CIO's constitution, adopted at the founding convention in 1955, vests supreme governing power in the biennial convention. Affiliated organizations, the most important of which are the national (or international) unions, are represented at conventions on the basis of their dues-paying membership. The AFL-CIO's affairs are directed between conventions by its executive officers (president and secretary-treasurer) assisted by the Executive Council, the Executive Committee, and the General Board. The Executive Council has the authority to issue charters to groups not eligible for membership in national unions and to combine directly affiliated local unions into organizing committees.

The chief governing body between conventions is the Executive Council, which consists of the 2 executive officers and 33 vice presidents. The Executive Council

-328-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labor Economics: Theory, Institutions, and Public Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 658

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.