Labor Economics: Theory, Institutions, and Public Policy

By Ray Marshall; Vernon M. Briggs Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 15
Development of Public Policy in Labor Relations

Earlier, in the discussion of the history of American trade unionism, the evolutionary stages of public regulation of labor relations were outlined. Prior to the 1930s, the courts were the dominant force in the determination of labor law. With only a few exceptions, the era was generally hostile to the activities of organized labor. With the passage of the Wagner Act in 1935 and the successful sustainment of its constitutionality in 1937, the federal government reversed itself. A climate of overt support for trade union activities was created. By 1947, with the enactment of the Taft-Hartley Act, the role of government changed again and gave countervailing rights and powers to employers and society. Govemment's role became that of the regulator of the activities of both labor and management. Statutory law became the instrument through which the public interest was manifested. In 1959, the Landrum-Griffin Act greatly increased the regulatory role of the federal government. Thus, as Thomas Kochan has observed, the combined effect of federal labor legislation from 1935 through 1959 was "to elevate the status of collective bargaining to new heights in our society."1 Indeed, as he notes, "collective bargaining was transformed into the preferred mechanism for determining wages, hours, and other terms of employment" in the private sector of the economy.2 During the 1960s, a series of presidential executive orders extended collective bargaining to public employees in the federal sector. Since then, a number of states have enacted legislation that extended collective bargaining to public employees in their jurisdictions.

Yet by the late 1970s, there were signs that the momentum of legislative support for collective bargaining was waning. As will be discussed shortly, in 1978 a major legislative effort to strengthen the workers' ability to organize was defeated through

____________________
1
Thomas A. Kochan, Collective Bargaining and Industrial Relations ( Homewood, I11.: Richard D. Irwin, Inc., 1980), p. 64. © 1980 by Richard D. Irwin, Inc.
2
Ibid., p. 65.

-479-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labor Economics: Theory, Institutions, and Public Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 658

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.