CHAPTER THREE
Oyster Bay
1873-76

Roosevelt had just turned fifteen when he and his mother and siblings arrived back in New York from Germany in the autumn of 1873. In early adolescence he was a bundle of contradictory traits. Still subject to bouts of asthma and other ailments, he was a body-builder and all-around enthusiast of physical fitness. Bookish and a budding writer, he lived for the outdoors, for the chase and the kill. Sheltered from social intercourse with almost everyone outside his family sphere, he had ranged widely across the Western world and seen nearly everything thought important by his generation of Americans. Adolescence is an age of contradictions, but even by the standards of fifteen-year- olds, Theodore Roosevelt was a study in contrasts.

Mittie and the Roosevelt children returned to a neighborhood different from than the one they had left. During the two decades since Theodore Sr. and Mittie had taken up housekeeping at the residence on Twentieth Street, the center of fashionable gravity in the city had continued to migrate north. For a time the old money had resisted the migration, but property values downtown continued to rise until even the old money couldn't afford not to move. The Theodore Roosevelts, trading uptown in the early 1870s to a new house at 6 West Fifty- seventh Street, were in good company.

Life in Manhattan has always held its excitements, but in the 1870s the middle part of the island produced peculiar thrills. Compared to the lower reaches, the newly settled portions required considerable cosmetic work before they were habitable. In another time or culture, the builders might have worked around the rocky outcrops and bluffs,

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
T.R.: The Last Romantic
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 900

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.