CHAPTER FIVE
A Man of His Own
1877-78

By all evidence, the Theodore Roosevelt of his first two years at Harvard was oblivious to the larger political events that swirled around the communities of Cambridge and Oyster Bay and the country as a whole. The Panic of 1873 and the ensuing depression had forced his family's firm out of a principal part of its longtime trade, but it rated only the most oblique mention in his letters. He seems not to have noticed the disputed presidential election of 1876, which returned the Republicans to the White House but terminated Reconstruction in the South. The biggest story of the summer of 1877--the labor violence that wrenched much of the nation--seems to have escaped him entirely.

That violence was hard to miss. One epicenter was western Pennsylvania, where June 21, 1877, the day on which Roosevelt was happily packing to leave Cambridge for his bird-collecting expedition in the Adirondacks, was known ever after as "the day of the rope." On that day Pennsylvania authorities hanged ten men for committing or inciting violence in the anthracite coal region of the state. The hangings marked the culmination of a government offensive against assertive labor unionists in the coalfields, epitomized by the radical "Molly Maguires." Opinions differed as to where justice in the coal- fields lay--with the miners or with management and the powers-that- were. But both sides and nearly all observers were shocked at the degree of violence, legal and otherwise, that the dispute provoked.

Yet the killings in the coalfields were almost immediately overshadowed by the violence in another industry. Less than a month after

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
T.R.: The Last Romantic
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 900

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.