HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW

CHRONOLOGY
1807 Born in Portland, Maine, February 27.
1825 Graduated from Bowdoin Collage, many of his poems already having been published in magazines.
1826-29 Studied in France, Spain, Italy, Germany.
1829-35 Professor and librarian at Bowdoin. Married Mary Storer Potter, 1831.
1835-36 Accepted professorship of modern languages and belles-lettres at Harvard, and went abroad to improve his knowledge of German 'and Scandinavian. Wife died. Outre-Mer published.
1836 Began comfortable but busy period of college work and pleasant social life.
1839 Hyperion and Voices of the Night published.
1841 Ballads and Other Poems.
1842 Went to Europe. Formed friendship with Freiligrath. Visited Dickens and others in England. Wrote Poems on Slavery on trip home.
1843 Married Frances Elizabeth Appleton. The Spanish Student.
1845 The Belfry of Bruges and Other Poems (published Dec., 1845; dated 1846).
1847 Evangeline.
1849 Kavanagh, a novel.
1850 The Seaside and the Fireside.
1851 The Golden Legend (afterwards part II of Christus).
1854 Resigned professorship.
1855 The Song of Hiawatha.
1858 The Courtship of Miles Standish and Other Poems.
1861 Tragic death of his wife.
1863 Tales of a Wayside Inn (second and third parts published in 1872 and 1873 respectively). Finished translation of Dante's Divine Comedy, begun earlier: publication completed in 1867.
1866 Flower-de-Luce (dated 1867).
1868 New England Tragedies (afterwards part III of Christus).
1868-69 Toured Europe. Honorary degrees from Cambridge and Oxford.
1871 The Divine Tragedy (afterwards part I of Christus).
1872 Christus, a Mystery (made up of the three parts already listed, with additions of interludes and a finale). Three Books of Song.
1873 Aftermath.
1874 The Hanging of the Crane.
1875 The Masque of Pandora, and Other Poems.
1878 Kéramos and Other Poems.
1880 Ultima Thule.
1881 Suffered nervous prostration.
1882 Died in Cambridge, March 24. In the Harbor (part II of Ultima Thule).
1883 Michael Angelo published.
1884 Bust unveiled in Westminster Abbey—first American so honored.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
I. Bibliography
The Cambridge History of American Literature, II, 425-436. (The basic bibliography, prepared by H. W. L. Dana. Includes items about Longfellow prior to 1918.)
Chew, B. The Longfellow Collectors' Hand-Book: A Bibliography of First Editions. New York: 1885.
Livingston, L. S. A Bibliography of the First Edition in Book Form of the Writings of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. New York: 1908.
II. Text
The Writings of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, with Bibliographical and Critical Notes. Riverside Edition. Bogton: 1886. 11 vols. ( Poems, I-VI; Prose, VII-VIII; Divine Comedy, IX-XI. Vol. VII, pp. 409-410, lists 22 reviews and studies of literary topics which have never been collected and are available only in periodicals, such as the review of a new edition of Sidney's Defence of Poetry in the North American Review, XXXIV, 56-78 [ Jan., 1832].)
Complete Works. Standard Library Edition. Boston: 1891. 14 vols. (Same as above, illustrated, with the addition of the three-volume Life by Samuel Longfellow.)
Complete Writings. Craigie Edition. Boston: 1904. 11 vols. (Same as the Riverside Edition, with illustrations added.)
Complete Poetical Works, ed. by H. E. Scudder. Cambridge Edition. Boston: 1903. (Reprinted at later dates. The best one-volume edition, with valuable headnotes, and with "A Chronological List of Mr. Longfellow's Poems" on pp. 676-679. There are other one-volume editions, the Household, the Cabinet, etc.)
Pettengill, R. W. (ed.). Longfellow's Boyhood Poems;a Paper . . . together with the Text of Hitherto Uncollected Early Poems and Bibliography. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: 1925. (The "Paper" is by G. T. Little.)
III. Biography and Criticism
Allen, G. W. "Longfellow", in American Prosody. New York: 1935, pp. 154-192. (An authoritative and detailed survey of Longfellow's use of a wide variety of meters and stanzas. Concludes: "Longfellow's greatest contribution . . . was not specifically any new theory or practice but a general, broad, and deep influence toward the search for new forms, based on a wide acquaintance with the chief poetic techniques of the world" [p. 191].)
Appelmann, A. H. "Longfellow's Poems onSlavery in Their Relationship to Freiligrath"

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Major American Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Philip Freneau 1
  • William Cullen Bryant 61
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 105
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 191
  • Edgar Allan Poe 243
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 287
  • James Russell Lowell 435
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 543
  • Emily Dickinson 603
  • Sidney Lanier 611
  • Walt Whitman 651
  • Vachel Lindsay 733
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 755
  • Notes Chronological, Bibliographical, Critical 779
  • William Cullen Bryant 788
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 798
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 817
  • Edgar Alian Poe 834
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 847
  • James Russell Lowell 860
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 882
  • Emily Dickinson 893
  • Sidney Lanier 903
  • Walt Whitman 914
  • Vachel Lindsay 929
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 938
  • General Principles of Poetics 948
  • General Index 951
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