GENERAL INDEX
Authors' names and general headings are in black face type, titles are in italics, and first lines of poems are in roman type. Where a part or all of the first line of a poem is used is a title, the first line only is entered in italics as th title. Page numbers preceded by "n" refer to notes on selections.
A beautiful and happy girl, 112
A crazy bookcase, placed before, 586
A gold fringe on the purpling hem, 184
A hermit's house beside a stream, 9
A line in long array where they wind betwixt green islands, 697
A midnight black with clouds is in the sky, 83
A mighty Hand, from an exhaustless Urn, 88
A mist was driving down the British Channel, 364
A ruddy drop of manly blood, 204
A subtle chain of countless rings, 192
A triumph may be of several kinds, 605, n. 899
A vision as of crowded city streets, 421
A wife at daybreak I shall be, 604, n. 899
A wind came up out of the sea, 385
Above, below, in sky and sod, 142
Abraham Davenport, 162, n. 813
Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight, 738, n. 934
Acknowledgment, 620, n. 910
Advice to Authors, 57
African Chief, The, 78, n. 795
After a Lecture on Shelley, 560
After a Lecture on Wordsworth, 559, n. 887
After great pain a formal feeling comes, 605, n. 899
After the Curfew, 594
Afternoon in February, 301, n. 853
Agassiz, 505, n. 878
Ages, The, 67, n. 794
Ah, broken is the golden bowl!—the spirit flown forever! 251
Ah, Clemence! when I saw thee last, 555
Ah! what pleasant visions haunt me, 304
Al Aaraaf, 246, n. 840
Aladdin and the Jinn, 752
All are architects of Fate, 304
All grim and soiled and brown with tan, 120
All Here, 572
All that we see, about, abroad, 56
Alone, 578
Alone! no climber of an Alpine cliff, 578
Along a river-side, I know not where, 477
Along the roadside, like the flowers of gold, 165
Alphonso of Castile, 219, n. 830
Ambition, 575
American Literature, An, 432
Among the Hills, 165, n. 814
Amy Wentworth, 146, n. 810
An Indian girl was sitting where, 73
An old man bending I come among new faces, 698
An old man in a lodge within a park, 421
And now gentlemen, 715
Andrew Rykman's dead and gone, 147
Andrew Rykman's Prayer, 147, n. 810
Annabel Lee, 265, n. 844
Announced by all the trumpets of the sky, 204
Another clouded night; the stars are hid, 575
Antiquity of Freedom, The, 85, n. 795
Apology, The, 192
Apparently with no surprise, 603, n. 898
Arcturus is his other name, 607, n. 901
Argument, An, 757, n. 936
Arisen at Last, 137, n. 808
Arrow and the Song The, 302, n. 853
Arsenal at Spring field, The, 297, n. 852
Art, 198, n. 827
As a fond mother, when the day is o'er, 427
As a twig trembles, which a bird, 476
As Jove the Olympian (who both I and you know, 40
As o'er his charts Columbus ran, 10
As one who long hath fled with panting breath, 428
As sunbeams stream through liberal space, 201
As the birds come in the Spring, 429
As they who watch by sick-beds find relief, 146
Ashes of soldiers South or North, 701
Assurances, 687, n. 922
Astrœa, 131

-951-

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Major American Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Philip Freneau 1
  • William Cullen Bryant 61
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 105
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 191
  • Edgar Allan Poe 243
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 287
  • James Russell Lowell 435
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 543
  • Emily Dickinson 603
  • Sidney Lanier 611
  • Walt Whitman 651
  • Vachel Lindsay 733
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 755
  • Notes Chronological, Bibliographical, Critical 779
  • William Cullen Bryant 788
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 798
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 817
  • Edgar Alian Poe 834
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 847
  • James Russell Lowell 860
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 882
  • Emily Dickinson 893
  • Sidney Lanier 903
  • Walt Whitman 914
  • Vachel Lindsay 929
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 938
  • General Principles of Poetics 948
  • General Index 951
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