Public Opinion, 1935-1946

By Hadley Cantril; Mildred Strunk | Go to book overview

PUBLIC OPINION, 1935-1946

ABSENTEEISM (LABOR)

1. (US Dec 10 '41) During the past four weeks have you been absent from work at any time because of sickness? Those who said they had missed time from work because of illness were asked: How many days did you miss from work? Asked of employed persons. ( aipo)

Medians
National total 2.3 days out of every 100
by sex
Men 2.5 days out of every 100
Women 2.0 days out of every 100

2. (US Mar 10 '43) What do you think should be done with workers in war factories who are regularly absent from work without good excuse? ( aipo)

Draft them; put them in service, into army 48%
Lay them off; discharge them 11
Absenteeism without cause is non-existent; no
 penalties
1
Other 32
No opinion 8

3. ( Canada June 16 '43) Do you think that workers in war industries who stay away from their work without a good excuse should be fined in addition to losing their pay? ( cipo)

Would
fine
Would
not fine
No
opinion
National total 58% 33% 9%
by occupation
Farmers 70% 23% 7%
Business and professional 53 38 9
White-collar 57 34 9
Labor 55 36 9

4. ( Canada June 16 '43) Do you think that a worker in a war industry who stays away from work without good reason should be punished as severely as a soldier who is absent without leave? ( cipo)

Yes 68% No 23% Undecided 9%

5. ( Canada Dec 11 '43) There has been a lot of talk recently about workers who stay away from their jobs. What, in your opinion, are the reasons why these people take time off from their jobs? ( cipo)

National
total
Labor
only
Too many taxes 29% 39%
Overworked; need relaxation; etc 16 15
Sickness 11 12
Jobs dull 2 2
Bad management 1 1
Poor working conditions 1 1
Carelessness; laziness; etc 13 11
Too much pay 12 8
Parties; frivolity; etc 7 7
Too easy to get jobs 3 3
-------- --------
95%* 99%*
* Miscellaneous answers and those who had no opinion brought the
total up to slightly over 100, as some advanced more than one explana-
tion.

ACCIDENTS

Prevention

1. ( Great Britain Oct '46) Can you recall having seen any poster or advertisement of the government's road safety campaign? ( bipo)

YesNo
National total 73% 27%
by sex
Men 74% 26%
Women 71 29
by age
21-29 years 81% 19%
30-49 years 78 22
50 years and over 64 36
by economic status
Higher 87% 13%
Middle 83 17
Lower 68 32

2. ( Great Britain Oct '46) Which [poster or advertisement have you seen]? Asked of 73% of the sample who said they recalled having seen a road safety campaign poster or advertisement. ( bipo)

Window poster 32%
"Keep death off the road" 17
"Hand" poster 1
Posters, general 3
Newspapers, general 4
Strip cartoons 1
"This is how it happened" series 1
Local campaigns 5
Miscellaneous 4
Don't remember; haven't taken much notice 3
No instance given 2
--------
73%

3. ( Great Britain Oct '46) Is there any way in which you think it [the government's road safety campaign] has increased your road sense? Asked of 73% of the sample who recalled having seen a poster or advertisement of the road safety campaign. ( bipo)

Has made me more aware of danger; more gen-
 erally careful
13%
More careful about crossing roads; look to left
 and right
6
Use pedestrian crossings more 1
Makes me more careful with children 2
Makes me more nervous; dislike posters; think
 them in bad taste
4
Have always been careful 10
Miscellaneous 3
No comment 34
--------
73%

-1-

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Public Opinion, 1935-1946
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Introduction vii
  • Participating Organizations xi
  • Legend xiii
  • Table of Contents xv
  • Public Opinion, 1935-1946 1
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