The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf

By Henry Pleasants; Hugo Wolf | Go to book overview
6.
Hermann Götz ( Goetz) ( 1840-1876), a German composer, pianist and organist, a student of Bülow at the Stern Conservatory in Berlin, whose principal appointment during his short life was that of organist at Winterthur in Switzerland. He is remembered now only for The Taming of the Shrew ( Der Widerspenstigen Zähmung). The Psalm discussed here was his Opus 14.
7.
Singverein, a constituent body of the Society of Friends of Music.
8.
Moriz Rosenthal ( 1862-1946), a student of Rafael Joseffy and later of Liszt. who went on to become one of the greatest and longest lived of all pianists.
9.
Arthur Friedheim ( 1859-1932) was reckoned a German pianist, although born and educated at St. Petersburg. He studied with both Rubinstein and Liszt, and achieved renown as virtuoso, conductor and teacher both in Europe and America where, as an American citizen. he died. He wrote a book of reminiscences, edited as Life and Liszt by Theodore L. Bullock.
10.
Built by Ludwig Bösendorfer ( 1835-1919) of the famous family of Viennese piano builders. and opened in 1872. No longer standing. it remained for many decades the principal home of chamber music concerts and recitals.

2. Virtuosos at the Philharmonic
Therese Malten in Tannhäuser

January 27, 1884

If we consider the program of last Sunday's special Philharmonic concert not in terms of its purely musical value or want of it, but rather in terms of those who played the various numbers, then it would appear that the Philharmonic's principal objective was to let virtuosos display their virtuosity.

We had five in this concert: Hector Berlioz, Ignaz Brüll, 1 Arnold Rosé, 2 Fräulein Bianchi3 and - the Philharmonic Orchestra. This latter multi‐ headed virtuoso, concentrated in an incomparably harmonious unity under its highly gifted conductor, Hans Richter, 4 gave an utterly admirable account of Mendelssohn's music to A Midsummer Night's Dream, a performance, indeed, beyond all praise. The playing of this inspired composition is and remains one of the Philharmonic's specialties.

No less perfect was their performance of Weber's "Invitation To The Dance." Who can fail to rejoice in this wholly delightful, lovely piano piece? One cannot escape the fact, however, that the full flavor of these bittersweet dancing lessons cannot be captured at the piano in a family circle with tea and

-3-

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