The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf

By Henry Pleasants; Hugo Wolf | Go to book overview
Elisabeth, Elsa, Sieglinde and Selika (in L'Africaine), and was Vienna's first Eva in Die Meistersinger.
12.
Hermann Winkelmann ( 1849-1912) came to Vienna from Hamburg in 1883, following his great success as the first Parsifal in Bayreuth, and was to remain until 1906 as the Heldentenor of his generation. He was Vienna's first Otello.
13.
Theodor Reichmann ( 1849-1903), born in Rostock and educated in Berlin, was one of the great German baritones of his generation, an internationally renowned Wotan, Sachs, Dutchman and Telramund. He created the role of Amfortas in Parsifal. He was a member of the Court Opera from 1882 to 1889, and rejoined the company in 1893 after touring England and America. He was admired for the beauty not only of his voice, but also of his person and bearing.
14.
Emil Scaria ( 1838-1886) studied with Manuel Garcia in London, joining the Court Opera in 1872, and quickly establishing himself as one of the great basses of vocal history. Of his Gurnemanz at the Bayreuth premiere of Parsifal. Lilli Lehmann wrote in Mein Weg: "Scaria as Gurnemanz will remain unforgettable for all those who had the good fortune to see him and hear him."
15.
Antonia ("Tony") Schläger ( 1860- ? ), a Viennese dramatic soprano who. like Regine Klein, had graduated to opera from operetta.
16.
Christian Dietrich Grabbe ( 1801-1836). German writer of historical dramas whose style and structure seem, in retrospect, to anticipate expressionism and film techniques of a century later. A contentious character, his early death was attributed to a combination of alcoholism and tuberculosis. The reference here is to his one comedy. Scherz, Satire, Ironie und tiefere Bedeutung ( Jest, Satire, Irony and Deeper Significance)
17.
Wilhelm Jahn ( 1835-1900) succeeded Franz Jauner as director of the Court Opera in 1881. and sustained that position until 1897, longer than any other director in the houses's history.

3. La Muette de Portici

February 2, 1884

We are most grateful to the management, ever on the alert for novelties, antiquities and other attempts at resurrection, for having brought us this time a work well worth a new mounting, not only because of the presumed centenary of Auber's birth, but also and primarily because of the exceptional affection and popularity this inspired work always enjoyed with the public.

As with all popular works, however, so it went with La Muette de Portici. 1 Its fate was to be played into the ground until rendered so mute by ever more crushing routine that it could bring forth only a few pitiable groans as an occasional stop gap in the repertoire. These, too, gradually diminished, and it seemed likely that there would soon be no breath at all. There it lay, dusty, unappreciated, forgotten — in the disreputable company of God knows what infamous composers — in the archives of the opera house. From there not a

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 291

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.