The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf

By Henry Pleasants; Hugo Wolf | Go to book overview
critic, Hermann Klein, said of him that had his art been as good as his voice "he would have escaped declining favor and a regrettable fate in after-years." He became a hotel porter in Nice.
8.
Gottardo Aldighieri ( 1824- 1906)created the role of Barnaba in La Gioconda in 1876. The words of Luigi Arditi's "Il bacio" are dedicated to him.
9.
Oreste Bimboni ( 1846-1905) was one of the ranking Italian conductors of the time. He was one of Colonel Mapleson's conductors in London and on his American tours.
10.
Siegmund Bachrich ( 1841-1913) was first violist of the orchestra of the Court Opera and of the Philharmonic. He was also violist, first of the Hellmesberger, and later of the Rose Quartet.
11.
Richard Kralik ( 1852-1934), philosopher, historian and poet, dreamed of reviving medieval mystery plays. He did, in 1893, produce a Weihnachtsfestspiel ( Christmas festival).
12.
Hugo Wittmann ( 1839-1923), a German journalist and musician, had come to Vienna via Paris in 1872. In Paris he had been correspondent for the Neue Freie Presse, whose editor he became after settling in Vienna. He was the author of many comedies, operetta libretti and short stories.

12. Mierzwinski and Others
Sing Il Trovatore
Ladies in the Moonlight
Friedheim Plays Liszt

April 6, 1884

Il Trovatore will be repeated, primarily in order that we may hear again, as at the last performance, a succession of those high notes with which Signor Mierzwinski favors the stagione audiences so generously. "Bon appetit," one feels like calling to the parterre, to whom every B and C from Mierzwinski's throat seems at least as savory as a fresh, succulent oyster.

Just watch them in that sublime moment when the tenor gazes down ecstatically from the beatific heights of his C or C sharp. They click their tongues in delight, pat their bellies contentedly. They become real frog's legs under the influence of Herr Mierzwinski's galvanic column of Memnon. 1 The ambitious among them attempt to imitate him, singing in the same register; the more modest opt for the safer terrain of the octave below; the true enthusiast, however, sings along pantomimically (a sign of great emotion), separating the upper and lower jaws according to the height and duration of the attacked tones a silly business, but one that may well afford more pleasure than Verdi's Il Trovatoreor even Mierzwinski's.

-34-

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