The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf

By Henry Pleasants; Hugo Wolf | Go to book overview

Symphony in 1873, the Third in 1887, the Fourth in 1881 (conducted by Richter), and two movements of the Sixth in 1883 (conducted by Jahn).

1.
Ferdinand Löwe ( 1865-1925), Viennese pianist, conductor and pedagogue, a pupil of Bruckner, and instrumental in the publication of many of his works. He subsequently became a cherished member of the small circle of Wolf's intimate friends and supporters.
2.
Josef Schalk ( 1857-1911), older brother of the more famous conductor, Franz Schalk ( 1863‐ 1931). Both were Bruckner's students. Josef is now remembered primarily for his piano transcriptions of the Bruckner symphonies. He also became an important advocate and propagandist for Wolf and his songs.

34. Wagnerians
Among Themselves

January 4, 1885

Thus, "strictly among ourselves," as Wagner liked to conclude some of his literary efforts. "Among ourselves," indeed, and whoever does not like it that way may avoid these private soirées. Since, fortunately, they have not yet become fashionable, like the Philharmonic concerts, for example, our music lovers may inspect with some composure the program of such an evening. 1. Bach. 2. Spervogel. 1 3. An unknown composer (not of the Mendelssohn school, but, horror of horrors, Paderborn, in other words, old-German). 4. Lieder (by whom? by Richard Wagner, perhaps, or Liszt or Berlioz or even old-German ... the singer must compensate you if the composition failed to please). 5. Romanza for Piano and Violin by Beethoven .... Our Beethoven (you say), that should be good -- but 6. Peter Cornelius? 2 And 7. Two numbers by Richard Wagner -- but they are two pieces to which you should not entirely close your ears since a clever critic 3 once called your attention to a pretty waltz motive alleged to occur in the scene of the flower maidens in Parsifal, although cautiously giving only a favorable prognosis to the Magic Fire Music.

Take it or leave it. You won't find much amusement, but you might be offered good music, and especially music, moreover, that you will not hear in any other concerts. But if you prefer to wait until these private soirées have become fashionable, you can continue to amuse yourselves at the Philharmonic concerts. I suspect, however, that you will wait in vain. An enterprise whose concern is solely artistic, taking commercial factors into account only to the extent of seeking to cover expenses, alienates the canons of fashion in the same degree that it accommodates the requirements of the age. One may

-100-

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