The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf

By Henry Pleasants; Hugo Wolf | Go to book overview

39. Das Andreasfest
Romantic Opera by Karl Grammann1

February 8, 1885

Our contemporary German composers all suffer from an idée fixe. They believe that they can set only librettos that deal from the beginning to end with matters utterly German.

(It sometimes happens, to be sure, that in the course of an ever so German opera, among peasants and burghers, in the forest or on the meadow, a swarm of light-footed short-skirted sylphs will make their presence abundantly conspicuous by their shameless and at the same time infinitely ludicrous antics. just as in the very un-German French grand opera. This seems not in the least to compromise the German patriotism of the composer and his librettist colleague, for both proceed, thereupon, to carry on more Germanically than ever, which is to say, more tediously, more heavily, more mindlessly, more incompetently than before. One need not, therefore, reckon it a denial of an audience's patriotism, however German that audience may be, if the Germans in its ranks, attesting their lively gratitude for the composer's patriotic sentiments by sincere applause, find it convenient at the opportune moment, i.e., just after the interpolated ballet, to take to their heels in all haste, and thus, by swift flight, salvage those vestiges of their wit and humor not melted away under the leaden roofs of such Germano-operatic boredom in order to defy with what remains of such precious gifts more serious castastrophes than deadly German opera evenings.)

For such composers anything not having to do with German sagas, German myths, German fables, does not exist. History books too, are industriously examined, but not without circumspection so far as the grandeur of the forefathers is bound up with the destinies of alien peoples. Welcome treasures, too, are the old German chronicles, and many a composer who has hunted vainly for a historical Minnesänger or Meistersänger has settled finally for a mythical rat catcher, just so long as the tale is German and, if possible. romantic, for on the romantic element all depends. But no, that's overstating the case. Romanticism alone is no longer enough for them. They find it too incredible that one should set off into the blue yonder in search of the marvel of Peru2without a historical setting. They know their public, and they know perfectly well that it is not a child, and that it will not easily be satisfied with

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 291

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.