The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf

By Henry Pleasants; Hugo Wolf | Go to book overview
3.
Apparently a word play on Kopist (copiest) and Komponist (composer). In Wolf's view, Brahms's symphonies were modeled on the classics of European music just as Thorvaldsen's sculptures were modelled on the Greeks and their Roman copiests.
4.
Friederich Friedländer ( 1825- 1901), a minor Viennese painter whose best known work is "Invalides à la Cantine" in the Vienna Art Museum.
5.
As elaborated by Schumann in his review of Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique, previously cited by Wolf (see footnote to notice of April 5, 1885).
6.
In his monumental Johannes Brahms, published in eight volumes between 1904 and 1914, Kalbeck has Brahms protesting strongly against this supposition.
7.
Wolf is quoting from Hanslick's review in the Neue Freie Presse of January 19.
8.
Joseph Ben Akiba (40-135), the greatest biblical scholar of his time, often called "the father of Rabbinical Judaism." He was a pioneer in the collection, collation and ordering of Judaic oral tradition. The insight attributed to him by Wolf did not originate with Akiba, although Akiba may have been responsible for its preservation and dissemination in Ecclesiastes 1:9.
9.
Wolf is having malicious fun at the expense of both Hanslick and Kalbeck. In his review, Hanslick had been the victim of a typographical error. What he wrote, defining or identifying the fundamental characteristics of Brahms's larger works, was: "männliche Kraft, unbeugsame Consequenz, ein ans Herbe streifende Ernst" [masculine strength, unbending consistency, a seriousness bordering on austerity]. In the paper, however, Ernst [seriousness] appeared as Frost [frost]. The error was corrected in Hanslick's Collected Works. Wolf continues his word play by substituting "erst" (with the quotation marks) for "Ernst." The German reads: "Hat doch Herr Hanslick mit dem 'herben Frost' es 'erst' gemeint."

73. Der Trompeter von
Säkkingen 1

January 31, 1886

Opera in three acts, with a prologue, by V. Nessler.

The libretto is fashioned with reasonable fidelity upon the Scheffel2 original i.e., the cast of characters is about the same, although what transpires among them is rather different. In order to set up an effective (?) ending, the librettist has seen fit to deviate somewhat from the Scheffel poem. This involves not so much the rechristening of Margareta as Maria, the daughter of the Baron, but rather the introduction of two persons of whom Scheffel's poem makes no mention. These are the soldier, Konradin, and the divorced wife of Count Wildenstein. To the first falls the task of giving Werner's career a bad turn by provoking a fight that leads to Werner's banishment. The job of the Countess is to see to a "satisfactory" conclusion. Let's have a closer look at this lady, and eavesdrop upon her at work.

A sister-in-law of the Baron, Countess Wildenstein is Maria's aunt [Base].

-187-

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