From Progressivism to Prosperity: World War I and American Society

By Neil A. Wynn | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Like many historical works this study has taken much longer to write than the actual events it describes. That it was completed at all was due to the patience of my publisher, Max Holmes, who had more faith in the author than was perhaps justified, and, with many editors, persisted through many delays. The final product is intended primarily for undergraduates and is the result of several years teaching courses about war and social change in America. My attempts to present the significance of particular historical events within the context of broader general change benefited from the contributions of numerous final-year students who have suffered many bad jokes and challenged several ill-formed assumptions.

Many other people and institutions assisted the author. The Polytechnic of Wales provided leave of absence and some financial help to make possible my acceptance of a research fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies in 1979. The ACLS fellowship enabled me to work unhindered in Washington, D.C., and Prof. Richard Downar of ACLS provided helpful guidance. The International Student House in Washington, D.C., provided a secure haven and a home base, which enabled me to become a student again, and the director, Paul Feys, Barbara Dirks, and the many "inmates" contributed to my education in the broadest possible sense. The Burtons, Murrays, and Rukeysers made my visits to Nashville, Buffalo, and Princeton possible—and enjoyable.

-ix-

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