From Progressivism to Prosperity: World War I and American Society

By Neil A. Wynn | Go to book overview

create a different America. The unrest after, and indeed during, the war was both a reaction to and reflection of those changes. The very intensity of wartime hysteria and Red Scare revealed the extent to which America had departed from prewar norms.


Notes
1.
Burl Noggle, Into the Twenties: The United States from Armistice to Normalcy ( Urbana, Ill., Chicago, and London, 1974); Robert K. Murray, Red Scare: A Study in National Hysteria, 1919-1920 ( New York, Toronto, and London, 1964); W. E. Leuchtenburg, The Perils of Prosperity, 1914-1932 ( Chicago and London, 1958); Stanley Coben, "A Study in Nativism: The American Red Scare of 1919-20," Political Science Quarterly 79, no. 1 ( March 1964): 52-75.
2.
Raymond B. Fosdick, Chronicle of a Generation: An Autobiography ( New York, 1958), 198-99.
3.
Jane Addams, The Second Twenty Years at Hull House ( New York, 1930), 153.
4.
Lane, The Letters of Franklin Lane: Personal and Political ( Boston and New York, 1922), 270; Josephus Daniels, The Cabinet Diaries of Josephus Daniels 1913-1921 ( Lincoln, Neb., 1963), 279, 341.
5.
New York Times 24 October 1918; E. Jay Howenstine, The Economics of Demobilization (Washington, D.C., 1944), 87-88.
6.
Noggle, Into the Twenties, 52-53.
7.
John Morton Blum, Joe Tumulty and the Wilson Era ( Boston, 1951), 150; John A. Thompson, "The First World War and the American Progressive Publicists," Ph.D. dissertation, Cambridge University, 1969, 442.
8.
National Conference of Social Work, Proceedings, 45th Annual Session, Kansas City, Missouri, May 15-22 ( 1918), 9; Estella T. Weeks, Reconstruction Programs: A Comparative Study of Their Content and of the Viewpoints of the Issuing Organizations ( New York, 1919), 69, and American Federationist, quoted, 11.
9.
Academy of Political Science, Columbia University, Proceedings: War Labor Policies and Reconstruction 8, no. 2 ( February 1919); " Foundations for Reconstruction," American Labor Legislation Review 3, no. 4 ( December 1918); Philip Taft, The A.F. of L. in the Time of Gompers ( New York, 1970), 369-72.
10.
Noggle, Into the Twenties, 39-40; National Catholic War Council, Administrative Committee, Bishops' Program of Social Reconstruction: A General Review of the Problems and Survey of Remedies for Social Reconstruction, 20th anniversary edition, presented to Senate, 6 June 1939; John Tracy Ellis, Documents of American Catholic History ( Milwaukee, 1956), 611.
11.
Baker to Wilson, 30 November, 1918, Reel 6, Baker Papers, LC; Wilson, address to Congress, 2 December 1918, in Alfred Bushnell Hart, Selected Addresses and Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson ( New York, 1918), 289-303.

-221-

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From Progressivism to Prosperity: World War I and American Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • From Progressivism to Prosperity *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Note on Sources xi
  • Introduction War, Reform, and Social Change— the First World War in American History xiii
  • Notes xx
  • From Progressivism to Prosperity *
  • 1: The Progressive Era American Society, 1900-1914 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2: From Peace to War 1914-1917 26
  • Notes 38
  • 3: Mobilizing the Population for War Propaganda and Civil Liberties 41
  • Notes 61
  • 4: Organizing for War Government, Business, and the Economy 65
  • Notes 82
  • 5: Labor and the War 86
  • Notes 124
  • 6: War, Women, and the Family 133
  • Notes 163
  • 7: Black Americans and the First World War 170
  • Notes 191
  • 8: The Aftermath of War Reconstruction, Red Scare, and the 1920s 196
  • Notes 221
  • Epilogue from Progressivism to Prosperity: the First World War in Perspective 226
  • Notes 236
  • Bibliography 239
  • Index 257
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