Piety and Poverty: Working-Class Religion in Berlin, London, and New York, 1870-1914

By Hugh McLeod | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
Male and Female

IN LONDON, NEW YORK and Berlin, the working-class districts were full of drinking places. The London pub was often a Gothic palace, rivalling the parish church as the most conspicuous local landmark, whereas the New York saloon or the BerlinKneipe tended to lie at the bottom of a block of tenements, and was often reached by descending a flight of stairs. All alike were strongholds of the working-class male. 'There were so many pubs in Berlin in earlier times,' one elderly woman recalls, 'there was a pub in every building. And when things perhaps got too boring for father upstairs, he would pop downstairs to play the fool. There were always people down there.' 1 Mother, meanwhile, would be left upstairs with the children and the sewing-machine.

The pub was the most vivid symbol of the separation of male and female worlds. It represented a freedom that most men could enjoy, at least for a few hours in the evening, but which was much less often available to married women. The atmosphere of the pub tended to be aggressively masculine—though, admittedly, there were men who had a drink with their wife on Saturday or Sunday, and some pubs had a corner reserved for women drinking with other women. Apart from the usual card-playing, chatting, storytelling and joking, pubs could also provide a meeting-place for all-male friendly societies, trade unions, political organizations or singing clubs.

But if men saw their evening in the pub as well-earned relaxation after a long day's toil, their wives often saw it as money squandered that was desperately needed for food and clothing. Observers of working-class life in all three cities noted the tendency for husband and wife to grow apart under the strain of life on very tight budgets. 2 Ellen Ross has described the sexual division of labour operating in working-class families in London. Nearly all tasks were the exclusive province of one sex or the other—the only area of overlap being the upbringing of children. This was primarily a job for the women, but some men also made a significant contri

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Piety and Poverty: Working-Class Religion in Berlin, London, and New York, 1870-1914
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.