Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview

LEESTER THOMAS


When Home Fails to Nurture the Self:
The Tragedy of Being Homeless at Home

Numerous lyrics, speeches, quips, plaques, and other similar paraphernalia extol the virtues of home. Moreover, perusal of any reputable dictionary confirms that home denotes a positive place—a place of sheltering or protection from external forces that might inflict illimitable dangers or nuisances. The term home may be used to refer to a physical place, such as a dwelling, a community, geographical region, or better yet, a country itself, as in one's homeland: take America, for example. The same term may refer to people that inhabit a place—one's kin or family, with attendant positive associations of warmth, comfort, acceptance, nurturing, and of course, charity, as in love. Finally, the security of the physical home and the familial home usually contributes to the development of a wholesome individual who loves, accepts, and feels at peace—at home—with self. But what happens to the psyche of the individual who is shown no charity in the larger environment nor at home? What happens to that psyche—to the self—when home becomes a frightening, soulessly cruel abode and being inside is as traumatic as being put outdoors? Toni Morrison addresses this very subject for African Americans in her novel The Bluest Eye.

As Morrison has stated, the initial purpose of the novel as an art form was to tell people something they didn't know, especially how to behave in this [ nineteenth-century England] new world, how to distinguish between

____________________
From The Western Journal of Black Studies 21, no. 1 (Spring 1997). © 1997 Washington State University Press.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 270

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.