Feminisms of the Belle Epoque: A Historical and Literary Anthology

By Jennifer Waelti-Walters; Steven C. Hause | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CLOTILDE DISSARD

The 1890s were a transitional period for French feminism. 1 The dominant figures from the founding of the women's movement in the 1870s and 1880s-Léon Richer ( 1824-1911), Maria Deraismes ( 1828-94), and Hubertine Auclert ( 1848-1914)—were no longer active. Richer retired in 1891 and turned his Ligue française pour les droits des femmes over to a younger generation of feminists such as Marie Bonnevial, who is represented in the next chapter. Auclert (see parts 6 and 7) married in 1888 and followed her husband to Algeria. Deraismes died in 1894, leaving her well-financed organization, Amélioration, in the hands of her more moderate sister, Anna Feresse‐ Deraismes.

Clotilde Dissard was one of the most prominent new leaders of French feminism during the 1890s. 2 Dissard considered herself a pioneering sociologist, but she is best remembered for her feminist writings. In 1895 she founded a monthly journal, La Revue féministe ( The Feminist Review), which she edited for nearly three years. This effort led Dissard to participate in the LFDF congress of 1896 and to publish a book based on that experience, Opinions féministes à propos du congrès féministe de 1896.3 She closed her review in the following year, but the appearance of La Fronde gave her a continuing feminist forum that she used for several years. Dissard had multiple interests, however, and later devoted her energy to the Russian immigrant community in France.

Clotilde Dissard recognized that there were many competing forms of feminism in belle époque France. She opposed most militant feminism as hopelessly quixotic and advocated, in its place, a period of reflection on fem

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feminisms of the Belle Epoque: A Historical and Literary Anthology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 337

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?