29
Chesapeake Bay

EXCEPT TO RUN FREE, Frederick Douglass never ran away from anything. There were things he reached past as he strode into a full engagement with life. He pressed excellence on his children and did not see that they needed something simpler, deeper; he looked beyond his wife, and scarcely seeing her, left her almost invisible; he lost touch with the men in the Freeland fields and in the shipyards, and so lost as well his closeness to ordinary people. There was anger within him—always. The world would not let him shrug off that burden. But even as he incurred and endured these disadvantages, he was amassing a richness of experience, a fullness of living.

It has been said that he ran away from being black. The opposite is true. Every time he walked up to a lectern to speak, he was seen: by his very presence he not only announced that he was black but also instructed all who looked at him that they were not to see that fact pejoratively. As Whitman did, Douglass sang of himself, and he did so just by standing on the platform. His simple appearance was a proud assertion that neither color nor previous condition of servitude was relevant to his aspirations, either for himself or for others.

His light skin and aristocratic mien have long suggested the same distancing from color of which much of the upper-class black community in America is accused. What has been missed has been Douglass's struggle to bridge that distance with his intellect, with an unswerving commitment to human dignity and equality. More than some of us with a different sense of society would have preferred, he sought to draw his people over to his side of the span instead of crossing back and engaging

-384-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Frederick Douglass
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 465

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.