Changing Nature's Course: The Ethical Challenge of Biotechnology

By Gerhold K. Becker; James P. Buchanan | Go to book overview

That age may finally have come. Biotech, so it seems, represents both the pinnacle of modern science and its eclipse, the power and the inability of reason. It vindicates admirably the Baconian formula that knowledge is power while illustrating at the same time the loss of moral orientation. The enormous advances we have made in science and technology are quite obviously not matched by a similar progress in our moral awareness that would enable us to put our scientific knowledge in the service of a shared vision of 'the good life'. It needs the combined efforts of all concerned, including scientists, policy makers, social planners and philosophers to take up the challenge which has begun to change nature's course and to impact our lives more than anything before in the history of mankind. Nietzsche's sketch of the ideological implications of modern science has been etched out with crude tools (he called this proudly 'to philosophize with a hammer'); it can, however, serve as a vivid reminder of what is at stake.


Notes
1.
Lawrence Busch, William B. Lacy, Jeffrey Burkhardt, and Laura R. Lacy, Plants Power and Profit. Social, Economic, and Ethical Consequences of the New Biotechnologies ( Cambridge, Ma and Oxford: Blackwell, 1992) 3. See also W. B. Lacy and L. Busch, "Changing Division of Labor Between the University and Industry:"The Case of Agricultural Biotechnology. In J. Molnar and H. Kinnucan, eds., Biotechnology and the New Agricultural Revolution ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1989) 21-50.
2.
Max Born, Physik und Politik ( Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1960) 45 (my translation).
3.
Office of Technology Assessment, New Developments in Biotechnology:Public Perceptions of Biotechnology ( Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1987) 9.
4.
Andrew Kimbrell, The Human Body Shop. The Engineering and Marketing of Life ( San Francisco: Harper San Francisco, 1993) 188f.; 268f.
5.
Stephen M. Gendel, "Foreword". In William F. Woodman, Mack C. Shelley 11, and Brian J. Reichel, Biotechnology and the Research Enterprise ( Ames: Iowa State University Press, 1989) VII-XII, VIII.
6.
M. Chiara Mantegazzini, The Environmental Risks from Biotechnology ( London: Frances Pinter, 1986) 136. A somewhat biased definition is found in Pat Spallone, Generation Games. Genetic Engineering and the Future of Our Lives ( Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992) 4: 'Biotechnology is the exploitation of living things, and of substances from living thing, to create products and processes for many different purposes.'
7.
David Suzuki and Peter Knudtson, Genethics. The Ethics of Engineering Life ( London: Unwin Paperbacks, 1988) 30-51; here and in the following I refer particularly to pages 32-34 of their acclaimed explanation of a rather complicated matter.
9.
Sharon J. Durfry and Amy E. Grotevant, "The Human Genome Project", Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal ( December 1991) 1 (Scope Note 17): 347-362, 347.

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Changing Nature's Course: The Ethical Challenge of Biotechnology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.