Victims, Authority, and Terror: The Parallel Deaths of d'orlaeans, Custine, Bailly, and Malesherbes

By George Armstrong Kelly | Go to book overview

11. The People's Massacre

At this pivotal point in our account, the sequence of argument needs to be restated. Bailly, as a "member of the Three Academies" and royal pensioner, was no less an aristocrat of the Old Regime than many members of the privileged estates who made their bow to politics during the earlier, more liberal phases of the Revolution; the status of the intellectuals, in relationship to the grands, had changed conspicuously since 1750. Unlike most of the gens de lettres, he had stepped forward. But his political instincts and inclinations were moderated by his prior elite experience. His style of politics was indebted to his natural reverence for the monarchical institution and to the lessons of statesmanship gleaned in an academic environment. While believing in enlightenment, he was far from worshiping the people. He was both a political product of the usufructory model and a politician well bound to consensualist convictions and rhetoric. His administration of Paris reflected his political understanding. Both it and the distinct markings of his previous career made him suspect to the radicals of the lumpenintelligentsia and, by 1791, a foe to be crushed. Marat and others were asking for his head well before July 1791. It is plausible, on the grounds just mentioned, that they would finally have had it even if the Champ de Mars episode had never taken place, although it is obviously impossible to prove this. Although one might imagine that Bailly's academic aloofness and detachment, his willingness to trust scientific proof and experiment, would have served him well in a political confrontation, and that the failure of that training betrayed him, my contention here is that the opposite is more likely to have been the case. For science -- including the science of administration -- was as much to be defended against the passions of unthinking mobs as against the conceivable errors of the investigator. Priestley's scientific equipment was destroyed by a mob in England. Bailly could not countenance a similar fate for his administrative apparatus: rightly or wrongly, he acted like a scientist defending his instruments. He also acted like an academician defending his prerogatives and amour-propre: the two cases melt into each other, and yet are distinct. The Jacobin onslaught on the academy at large will be described in the next chapter.

When Bailly was brought to trial in November 1793, he was convicted on two counts: (1) connivance with Lafayette and others in the escape of the royal family from the Tuileries; and (2) responsibility for the fusillade

-182-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Victims, Authority, and Terror: The Parallel Deaths of d'orlaeans, Custine, Bailly, and Malesherbes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 396

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.