The Mohicans of Stockbridge

By Patrick Frazier | Go to book overview

10
LOVED AND LOATHED IN THE ARMY

Regardless of whether angels would have found the Stockbridges worthy of enrollment in heaven, Massachusetts deemed their men quite acceptable for military enlistment. Though they saw little action during 1757, the earl of Loudoun had found them of great use during the 1756 campaign, and he sought to expand enlistments by including Connecticut Mohegans. Loudoun had been supplanted by Gen. James Abercromby, but the effort to raise both tribes for the 1758 campaign continued. In January the Stockbridges got a signed agreement for raising fifty privates, a sergeant, an ensign, a lieutenant, and a captain. This time, though, the Indians had to supply themselves with arms, blankets, and incidentals, but they were advanced $500 toward that end.1

On April 12 William Johnson held a conference with the Stockbridges and the Mohawks, during which he urged the Mohicans to alert kindred tribes to be in readiness to join him. The Stockbridges complied and sent word to other villages, including that of the Connecticut Mohegans, several of whom had been serving with Connecticut troops and Rogers Rangers.2 By late spring there were enough Mohicans and Mohegans at Fort Edward to form three companies of Indians for Rogers Rangers. The British planned a major move against Canada, with Ticonderoga as the first target, and wanted as many Indians and rangers as possible to reconnoiter and to harass, scalp, or capture the enemy. Jacob Naunauphtaunk was soon promoted to captain of Cheeksaunkun's old company,

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